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" O yes ! 0 yes ! in a perfect sameness of Voice. But however ridiculous the monotone in speaking may be in the above-mentioned characters, in certain solemn and sublime passages in poetry it has a wonderful... "
A Key to the Classical Pronunciation of Greek, Latin and Scripture Proper ... - Page 248
by John Walker - 1804 - 285 pages
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A Rhetorical Grammar: In which the Common Improprieties in Reading and ...

John Walker - 1801 - 392 pages
...Hear ye I into O yes I Oyes! in a perfect sameness of voice. But, however ridiculous the monotone in speaking may be in the above-mentioned characters,...and sublime passages in poetry it has a wonderful force and dignity ; and, by the uncommonness of its use, it even adds greatly to that variety with...
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A Key to the Classical Pronunciation of Greek, Latin and Scripture Proper ...

John Walker - 1807 - 285 pages
...Hear ye ! into O yes ! 0 yes ! in a perfect sameness of Voice. But however ridiculous the monotone in speaking may be in the above-mentioned characters,...the ear is so much delighted. This monotone may be defined to be a continuation or samO ness of sound upon certain words or syllables, exactly like that...
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A Key to the Classical Pronunciation of Greek, Latin and Scripture Proper ...

John Walker - 1807 - 326 pages
...Hear ye ! into O yes ! O yes ! in ft perfect sameness of voice. But however ridiculous the monotone in speaking may be in the above-mentioned characters,...and, by the uncommonness of its use, it adds greatly {o that variety with which the ear is so much delighted. . - . This monotone may be defined to be a...
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The American Orator, Or, Elegant Extracts in Prose and Poetry: Comprehending ...

Increase Cooke - 1811 - 408 pages
...uncommonness of its use, when the subject is grand and the language dignified, it may be used in prose, where it adds greatly to that variety, with which the ear is so much delighted. The following sentences are defined, and the manner of reading them pointed out, particularly with...
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The American Orator, Or, Elegant Extracts in Prose and Poetry: Comprehending ...

Increase Cooke - 1819 - 494 pages
...uncommonness of its use, when the subject is grand and the language dignified, it may be used in prose, where it adds greatly to that variety, with which the ear is so much delighted. The following sentences are defined, and the uer of reading them pointed out, particularly with regard...
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Principles of Elocution: Containing Numerous Rules, Observations, and ...

Thomas Ewing - 1819 - 436 pages
...sublime passages, has a wonderful force and dignity ; and, by the uncommonness of its use, it even adds greatly to that variety with which the ear is so much delighted.* EXAMPLES. 1. High on a throne of royal state, which far Outshone the wealth of Ormus or of Inde ; Or...
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A Rhetorical Grammar: In which Improprieties in Reading and Speaking are ...

John Walker - 1822 - 383 pages
...Hear ye ! into 0 yes ! O yes ! in a perfect sameness of voice. But, however ridiculous the monotone in speaking may be in the above-mentioned characters,...and sublime passages in poetry it has a wonderful force and dignity ; and, by the uncommonness of its use, it even adds greatly to that variety with...
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A Rhetorical Grammar: In which the Common Improprieties in Reading and ...

John Walker - 1823 - 373 pages
...Hear ye! into O yes! O yes! in a perfect sameness of voice. But, however ridiculous the monotone in speaking may be in the above-mentioned characters,...and sublime passages in poetry it has a wonderful force and dignity ; and, by the uncommonness of its use, it even adds greatly to that variety with...
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Principles of Elocution: Containing Numerous Rules, Observations, and ...

Thomas Ewing - 1832
...and sublime passages, has a wonderful force and dignity ; and by the uncommonness of its use, it even adds greatly to that variety with which the ear is so much delighted.* . EXAMPLES. 1. High on a throne of royal state, which far Outshone the wealth of Ormus or of Inde ....
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A Key to the Classical Pronunciation of Greek, Latin, and Scripture Proper ...

John Walker, William Trollope - 1833 - 187 pages
...Hear ye ! into 0 yes ! Oi/es' in a perfect sameness of voice. Hut however ridiculous the monotone in speaking may be in the abovementioned characters,...the ear is so much delighted. This monotone may be defined to be a continuation or sameness of sound upon certain words or syllables, exactly like that...
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