The American Agriculturist, Volume 2

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Geo. A. Peters, 1843
 

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Page 222 - TREATISE ON FOOD AND DIET: With Observations on the Dietetical Regimen suited for Disordered States of the Digestive Organs ; and an Account of the Dietaries of some of the principal Metropolitan and other Establishments for Paupers, Lunatics, Criminals, Children, the Sick, &c. By JON. PEREIRA, MDFRS & LS Author of
Page 30 - THE NATURE AND PROPERTIES OF THE SUGAR CANE ; With Practical Directions for the Improvement of its Culture, and the Manufacture of its Products.
Page 254 - BAKER. PLAIN AND PRACTICAL DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING CONFECTIONARY AND PASTRY, AND FOR BAKING. With upwards of Five Hundred Receipts, CONSISTING OF DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING ALL SORTS OF PRESERVES...
Page 254 - PLAIN AND PRACTICAL DIRECTIONS FOR COOKING AND HOUSEKEEPING, 'WITH UPWARDS OF SEVEN HUNDRED RECEIPTS, Consisting of Directions for the Choice of Meat and Poultry, Preparations for Cooking; Making of Broths and Soups ; Boiling, Roasting, Baking and Frying of Meats, Fish, &c.
Page 303 - GRAFTING. Grafting is the taking a shoot from one tree and inserting it into another in such a manner that both may unite closely and become one tree. These shoots are called scions or grafts, and in the choice of them...
Page 129 - Agriculture is the most healthful, the most useful, and the most noble employment of man.
Page 327 - The lovely young Lavinia once had friends; And Fortune smiled, deceitful, on her birth. For, in her helpless years...
Page 238 - He answered and said unto them, When it is evening, ye say, It will be fair weather : for the sky is red.
Page 275 - The mass begins to ferment sooner or later, according to the warmth of the weather, and the maturity of the plant sometimes in six or eight hours, and sometimes in not less than twenty. The liquor grows hot, throws up a plentiful froth, thickens by degrees, and acquires a blue colour, inclining to a violet ; at this time, without touching the herb, the liquor impregnated with the tincture is let out, by cocks in the bottom, into another vat placed for that purpose, so as to be commanded by the...
Page 94 - Postmaster-General, and late editor of the Turf Register and American Farmer. Mr. Skinner is one of our most pleasing writers, and has been familiar with the subject of the horse from childhood, and we need not add that he has acquitted himself well of the task. He also takes up the important subject, to the American breeder, of the Ass, and the Mule. This he treats at length and con amore. The Philadelphia edition of the Horse is a handsome octavo, with numerous wood-cuts." American Agriculturist.

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