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Speech of fir Hercules Langrifhe,

508
The Irish Proteit to the Ministerial Manifesto,

ibid.
Sir Lucius O'Brien's Letters concerning the Trade and Manu.
factures of Ireland,

ibid.

Mr. Burke's Speech on the Motion made for Papers relative to

the Directors for charging the Nabob of Arcot's private Debts

to Europeans on the Revenues of the Carnatic,

ibid.

Cruden's Address to the Loyal Part of the British Empire, 309

Some Obfervations on the Militia,

ibid.

The Oriental Chronicles of the Times,

ibid.

The Claims of the British Seamen to a more equal Distribution

of Prize-Money,

ibid.

History of the Westminster Election,

310

A Fragınent of the History of John Bull, esq.

ibid.

Blizard's Desultory Reflections on Police,

ibidi

Dr. S. Johnson's Prayers and Meditations,

ibid.

Jones's Considerations on the Nature and Oeconomy of Beasts

and Cattle,

311

A Dissertation or Discourse on Suicide,

The Female Aeronaut, a Poem,

313

Thomas's Frolics of Fancy,

314

Oracle concerning Babylon, and the Song of Exultation, ibid!

Booker's Poems,

ibid.
The Swindler, a Poem,

ibid.
The Strolliad, an Hudibrastic Mirror,

ibid.
The Becs, the Lion, and other Beasts,

ibid,

Robinson's Jeffy, or the Forced Vow,

315

Ode to Lansdown Hill,

ibid.

Poems by a Literary Society,

ibid.

The Demoniad, or Pests of the Day,

ibid.

Urim and Thummim, a Poem,

ibid.

The Tears of the Pantheon,

ibid.

The Loufiad, an heroic-comic Poem,

ibid.

Whitchurch's Monody to the Memory of Ad. Hyde Parker; 316

The Muse of Britain, a Dramatic Ode,

ibid.

As You like it, a Poem,

ibid.

Meffina, a Poem,

ibid:

History of the Hon. Edward Mortimer,

ibid.

Maria; or, the Obsequies of an unfaithful Wife,

318

Memoirs and Adventures of a Flea,

ibid:

Dent's Force of Love, a Novel,

ibid.

G. A. Stevens's Lecture on Heads, with Additions by Mr. Pilon, ib.

Lunardi's Account of his 2d Acrial Voyage, from Liverpool, 3.99

Southern's Treatise on Aerostaric Machines,

ibid.

Poole's Treatise on Strong Beer,

320

Feinale Monitor,

ibida

An earnest and affectionate Address to Farmers in relation to the

Payment of Tythes,

ibid.

Letter to a female Friend, by Mrs. Sage, the first English fe

male aerial Traveller,

ibid.

Mrs. Upton's Miscellancous Pieces, in Prose and Versey. ibid.

Narrative of Facts, supposed to throw Lights on the History

of the Bristol Stranger,

ibid.

Sparrman's

Sparrman's Voyage to the Cape of Good Hope, 321, 413

Dr. Pew's Medical Sketches. Part I.

329

Relhan's Flora Cantabrigienfis,

331

Stone's Essay on Agriculture,

333

Fléchere's La Grace & la Nature, Poëme,

334

Boswell's Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides with S. Johnson,

LL. D.

337

Scott's (John) Critical Essays on some of the Poems of several

English Poets,

345

Drinkwater's History of the late Siege of Gibraltar,

350

Sulivan's Analysis of the Political History of India, ad Edit. 361

Tour through Parts of England, Scotland, and Wales, 2d Edit. 368

The New Annual Register, for 1784,

372

Bibliotheca Topographica Britannica, No. XXI.-XXV. 374

Dissertations on the internal Evidences of Christianity,

Address to the Stockholders,

388

British Rights asserted,

389

Tenth Chapter of the Acts of the Chancellor of the Exchequer, ib.

Gibbons's Reply to Sir Lucius O'Brien, Bart.

ibid.

A Retrospective View of the increasing Number of the stand-

ing Army of Great Britain,

ibid.

Jenkinson's (Right Hon. Charles) Collection of all the Treaties

of Peace, &c. between Great Britain and other Powers, 390

Report of the Cricklade Case,

ibid.

Hanway's Neglect of the effectual Separation of Prisoners, &c.

the Cause of the frequent Thefts, &c.

ibid.

Brown's Restitution of all Things,

ibid.

Scott's (Tho.) Discourse upon Repentance,

391

Plantagenet, a Poem,

392

Whitmore's Royal Tears,

ibid.

The Royal Dream,

ibid.

The Power of Oratory, an Ode,

ibid.

The Æsopiad,

ibide

Holcroft's Choleric Fathers, a Comic Opera,

393

Mrs. Inch bald's Appearance is against them,

ibid.

Dent's Lawyer's Panic,

ibid.

Adventures of George Maitland, esq.

394

Constance, a Novel,

ibid.

Francis the Philanthropist,

395

Warbeck, a pathetic Tale,

ibid.

The Quaker, a Novel,

ibid.

Walwyn's Love in a Cottage,

ibid.

Mrs. Cartwright's Duped Guardian,

396

Dr. Johnson's Life of Dr. Watts,

ibid.

Sketch of the Life of Pope Clement XIV,

397

Memoirs of George Anne Bellamy,

ibid.

Heroic Epistle to Major Scott,

ibid,

The Degeneracy of the Times,

ibid.

Reflections an the Study of Nature,

ibid.

Remarks on the extraordinary Conduct of the Knight of the

Ten Stars,

398

Wedgwood's Letter to a Proprietor of the Navigation from the

Trent to the Mersey,

ibid.

6

Mac
456

Mac Intosh's Collection of Gaelic Proverbs,

398

Du Mitand's New French Spelling-book,

399

Miscellaneous Thoughts,

ibid.

Letters between an illustrious Personage and a Lady of Honour, ib.

London unmasked ; or, the New Town Spy,

ibid.

Lawrie's History of the Wars in Scotland,

400

Omai's Letter to the Earl of ***,

ibid.

Annotations on the Trial of Mrs. H. Errington, for Adultery, ib.
Q:ven's Translation of the Satires of Juvenal,

401

Heron's Letters of Literature,

405

Thoughts on the Properties and Formation of Air,

424

Medical Transactions, Vol. III.

428

Answer to Ramsay's Efsays on the Treatment and Converlion

of African Slaves,

436

Cursory Remarks on Ramsay's Essays, &c.

437

Ramsay's Reply to the personal Invectives and Objections in the

above Two Answers,

439

Ramsay's Inquiry into the Effects of putting a Stop to the Afri-

can Slave Trade,

440

Dr. Chauncy's Five Differtations on the Scripture Account of

the Fall,

444

Redpath's Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy,

453

Probationary Odes for the Laureatship,

Criticisms on the Rolliad, Part I.

458

Observations on Antimonial Preparations,

464

Dr. Wallis's Translation of Sauvages's Nosologia Methodica

Oculorum,

465

Dr. Falconer's Edition of Dobson's Medical Commentary on

fixed Air,

466

Dr. Corp's Effay on the Jaundice,

467

Dr. Pearson's Directions for impregnating the Buxton Waters
with Gasses,

468
Crofse's Power of Friendship,

ibid.
Black's Vale of Innocence,

ibid,

Translation of Fletcher's Ode on the Peace of 1783, 469

The Etymologist, a Comedy of Three Acts,

.470

The Woman of Quality,

ibid,

The Lady's Tale,

ibid.

Cumberland's Character of the late Lord Visc. Sackville, ibid.

Remarks on Boswell's Journal on a Tour to the Hebrides, 473

Elements of English Grammar,

474

Mac Packe's Oixidic, or Nutshells,

ibid,

Guide through London, Westminster, Southwark, &c. .476

Hutton's Journey from Birmingham to London,

477

Proposals for establishing, at Sea, a Marine School, 478

Mavor's Universal Stenography,

ibid,

A General Dictionary of the English Language,

ibid,

Baron Munchausen's Narrative of his Travels and Campaigns in

Ruffia,

479

Case of Major John Savage,

ibid.

New Annals of Gallantry,

ibid.

Correspondence,

THE

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CRITICAL REVIEW

For

JUL

Y,

1785.

1

Philosophical Rhapsodies. Fragments of Akbur of Beilis. Con

taining Reflections on the Laws, Manners, Cuftoms and Religions, of certain Afiatic, Afric, and European Nations. Cola lected and now fir published. By Richard Joseph Sulivan,

Esq. In three Volumes. 8vo. 155. in Boards. Becket. "T

HE following fragments were written by a native of

Affyria, who, in very early youth, was removed to the continent of Europe, and thence to England. During his refidence in England with a friend of his father's, he became inAtructed in its language, and in the principles of its religion. He then travelled; and in various countries threw together the reflections which appear in the following sheets.''

This is the account of the editor, and we ought not to diftrust it; but whether Akbur really existed, or some European author has indulged his fancy, and wandered in idea under this guise, is of little consequence: the work itself is our object, and merits our recommendation. The author is, a candid and intelligent traveller, a friend of his fellow-creatures, and a zealous advocate for the offices of humanity. He travels, not to describe buildings, prospects, or the the various ornaments of differing fancy; but to examine the manners and customs, 10 delineaie the human heart, and to see it under.different disguises, but ftill poffefing the same generous propensities, the same yirtues, and the same weaknesses. His mind is en lightened, and his sentiments liberal : indeed his liberality -fometimes degenerates a little into scepticism; but we find nothing to reprehend, for we discover it only by the terrors which he seems to feel when on holy ground, and the restraint frequently viâble when his enquiries have brought him to the verge of the fanctuary. His language is clear, simple, and unornamented ; and, in general, we think these Philosophical Rbaprodies, unconnected in form, rather than in substance, furnish a pleasing and rational entertainment. VOL. LX. July, 1785.

B

This

This mental travelling, this review of the minds and manners, is highly useful. It divests us of that unsocial pride, which raises our own imaginary rank; for virtues and vices are nearly the same in all countries; benevolence is always amiable, and a narrow selfishness despicable, from the hovels of the Hottentot to the caverns of Lapland. It expands the mind, since it shows that happiness and misery are more equally diffused than we should suspect, from a first and transient view; and it teaches us to respect the errors of others, when they are found not to be more gross and numerous than our own.

The first question, which neceffarily occurs to the mental traveller, is the origin of the different nations, and the varieties of the human race. These questions are involved with cach other ; for, if the whole world did not proceed from one pair, no origin is necessary, or at leall none can be determined. This is a subject which has not yet been decided, and the road to investigation is fhut up, till some liberal theologian hall clearly show, that the Mosaic account of the creation is not to be understood in a literal or an universal sense. The first men for piety and learning, whom we have conversed with, have agreed that it is not so; and indeed, the account of the early ages seems to have been chiefly designed to preserve the Jewish genealogies. It is difficult to find one precept, either of morality or religion, except the punishment inflicted on the murderer, necessary to the conduct of our lives, not to add, that the whole is related in the uncertain mode of tradition. We chiefly mean to refer to the ages before the flood; and should not have hazarded this opinion, if we had not known that it was supported by the best authorities. Our author dwells chiefly on the different races of men, and on those tribes, in appearance, most remote from them, viz. the white men on the isthmus of Darien, and the Albinoes of Africa. But, in fact, there are no two species of the fame genus, in the whole range of animated nature, more distinct than the wooly-headed African, and the copper-coloured American. To talk of the effects of climate is absurd : it may infuence the height, the strength, and from thence the manners; but it would never enlarge the lip, flatten the nose, or

bend the knees. Besides, we know of no effect of climate beyond what may be produced by the degree and duration of heat and cold, by the effe&ts of moisture more or less combined with them. Yet in America there are parts as swampy as the banks of the Gambia, and deferts aš dry and torrid as those of Ethiopia. Akbur does not decide; but he acts a little un

fairly;

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A

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