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women (p. 268) beating their faces and wailing, and a youth carrying the staff, chair, and box of the deceased. At the head of the procession is the kher heb or master of funereal ceremonies, who reads from an open roll of papyrus the funereal service. The scene on page 268 represents the ceremony of "opening the mouth,” which takes place at the door of the tomb. Before the tomb stands the mummy of Hu-nefer to receive the final honours; behind him, and embracing him, stands Anubis, the god of the dead, and at his feet in front are his wife Nasha and her daughter to take a last farewell of the body. By the side of a table of offerings stand three priests: the sem priest, who wears a panther's skin, holding in his right hand a libation vase, and in the left a censer; a priest who offers vases of unguents to the deceased ; and a priest who holds in one hand the instrument ur-heka 8 with which he is about to touch the eyes and mouth of the mummy, and in the other the instruments for “opening the mouth.” On the rounded stelen, at the door of the tomb, is inscribed :-"Hail, Osiris, chief of Amenta, the lord of eternity, spreading out in everlastingness, lord of adorations, chief of the cycle of his gods; and hail, Anubis (dweller) in the tomb, great god, chief of the divine dwelling. May they grant that I may go in and come out from the underworld ; that I may follow Osiris in all his festivals at the beginning of the year; that I may receive cakes, and that I may come forth in the presence of [Osiris], I the ka of Osiris, the greatly favoured of his god, Hu-nefer.”

In the lower register are a cow and calf, a priest holding a vase A, a priest carrying a haunch of a bull w , a table of offerings, a sepulchral box 8 and a table upon which are arranged the instruments employed in the ceremony of

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The hieroglyphic text beneath is the First Chapter of the Book of the Dead. (From British Museum Papyrus, No. 9901.)

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An Egyptian Funeral Procession.

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An Exyptian Funeral Procession and the Performance of the Ceremony of “ Opening the Mouth" at the

Door of the Tomb. (From British Museum Papyrus, No. 9,001.)

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opening the mouth, viz., the Pesh-en-kef , the haunch @V, the libation vases VVU, the feather , the instruments n

, the ur-heka, the boxes of purification 3 3 , the bandlet J, etc.

After the death of a man it was thought that he was taken into the hall of the god Osiris, judge of the dead, and that his conscience, symbolized by the heart, was weighed in the balance before him. An excellent idea of what the Egyptians believed in this matter may be gathered from the two following scenes in the Papyrus of Ani. Ani and his wife Thuthu are entering the Hall of Double Truth, wherein the heart Ø is to be weighed against the feather \, emblematic of Right and Truth, or Law. This ceremony is being performed in the presence of the gods “Heru-khuti (Har

machis) the great god within his boat” 98120

ka; Temu ; Shu po 10; «Tefnut, lady of heaven, " 2 m -2;Seb3JA “Nut, lady of heaven, » ; Isis de 2n; Nephthys 78; “Horus, the great god,” 78; “ Hathor, lady of Amenta,” Njom ; Hu -) and Sa & Upon the beam of the scales is the dogheaded ape 3, the companion or attendant of Thoth,

“the scribe of the gods.” The god Anubis, jackal-headed, is kneeling to examine the indicator of the balance, which is suspended from a projection made in the form of K. The inscription above the head of Anubis reads :—“Saith he

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