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OUTLINES OF INDIAN HISTORY.

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WITH MAPS, AND APPENDICES CONTAINING DETAILS (WITH AREA
AND POPULA

LATION) OF THE DIFFERENT PRESIDENCIES

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226. j.167

CHISWICK PRESS :-PRINTED BY WHITTINGHAM AND WILKINS,

TOOKS COURT, CHANCERY LANE.

PREFACE.

TH
HESE “Outlines," arranged on the plan adopted

by Messrs. Ince and Gilbert in their excellent little work, “ Outlines of English History," have been divided into three parts, the Hindū, Mahomedan, and Christian periods, such as are now generally recognized as correct divisions of Indian history,—the first extending from the earliest periods of Hindū history up to the date of the invasion of India by Sūltān Mahmūd of Ghuzni (A.D. 1001). This portion, which is very indistinct and unsatisfactory in character, abounds in fabulous narratives and puerile legends, and though there is much that is interesting in the study of the two great Hindū epic poems, the Māhābhārat and the Rāmāyāna, the subjects are essentially mythical, and there is such an utter absence of all reliable dates, as to make them altogether useless as guideposts to authentic history.

The second portion extends from the reign of Sūltān Mahmūd, the Ghuznivide, to A.D. 1761, the year

which witnessed the disastrous battle of Panipat, and the consequent annihilation of the great Maratta power, while at the same time it saw the Mogul Emperor of Delhi a fugitive, and the English already sufficiently powerful to take an important political part in India. This portion of its history is one of great interest, as describing the gradual acquisition of nearly all India by the Mahomedans, and particularly so when treating of the Mogul emperors of the house of Teimūr, whose extensive conquests, as well as splendour and magnificence, have been made known not only by the native historians of

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