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William I.-(1797-1888.) King of

Prussia (1861-88), Emperor of
Germany (1871-88), X, 276, 279,

285, 313; XV, 226, 227, 237.
William II.-(1859- .) Emperor of

Germany, x, 288, 313; training
of, xv, 22, 23; cause of

popu.
larity and

power, 206, 211;
compared with Frederic the
Great, 209, 214, 215; family
history, 209; interferes in the
Transvaal, 210, 211; becomes
Emperor, 211; extensive reader,
211; religion and home life,
212, 213; fearlessness, 213, 214;
enters army, 215; attends Bonn
University, 215; made major-
general, 215;

issues two pro-
nunciamentos coming

to
throne, 216; extensive travels,
216, 217; desires for a greater
Germany, 218; seizes Kiao Chow,
219, 220; sends Admiral Died.
richs to annoy Admiral Dewey,
221; refuses to receive Trans-
vaal envoys, 222; sends brother
to America, 223, 224; presents
monument of Frederic the Great
to America, 224-226; promises
to cultivate Russia's friendship,
228, 229; reasons for dismissing
Bismarck, 229-233; trained by
Bismarck in diplomacy, 233;
grows in popularity, 233, 234;
practical accomplishments, 234;
adverse to advice, 234-236; love
for war, 236; recklessness, 236,

237.
William III, of England (1650-

1702.) Accession of, V, 104;
vii, 187; his virtues, 188; his
throne not a bed of roses, 188;
unfortunate in his Flemish cam-
paigns, 189; union of Scotland
and England, 191; fixed succes-
sion in House of Hanover, 191;
fall from horse and death, 191;

vil, 62, 66, 160, 203, 251, 282,
286, 331, 345, 346, 350; ix, 82;

xii, 179; xiii, 258.
William IV.-(1765-1837.) King

of England (1830-37), theme:
"English Reforms,” x, 25; the
Tories in power and hostile to
reform, 25; social and political
England at the era, 26, 29; the
Whigs pledged to parliamentary
reform, 30; the struggle an
epoch in English history, 31;
Russell's Reform Bill (1831),
31; its provisions and aims, 33;
passes third reading after period
of stormy debate, 36; defeated
in House of Lords, 38; commo-
tions throughout the country,
39; Bill of 1832 enlarging rep-
resentation of people becomes
law, 40; Irish affairs, 43-45;
the tithes question, 45, 49; Mel.
bourne's administration, 51;
abolition of slavery in British
West India Islands, 52; and in
all British dominions, 53; Trade
unions and war (1834) between
capital and labor, 54, 55; repeal
of house tax and poor law
amendment, 56; passing of mu.
nicipal reform bill, 57; demise
of William IV and accession of
Queen Victoria, 58, 59; the
penny postage law, 59; modi:
fications in the criminal code,
60; Peel's second ministry
(1841) and its great political
heads of portfolios, 61; relief
from abuses and distresses of
George IV's era, 62; death, 322,

334.
William, Prince of Prussia.-3.

276.
William and Mary. English

sovereigns (1689-94), Vi, 294;
accession of, vii, 187; Declara.
tion of Right, xiii, 357.

-

Roman numerals refer to Volumes. For location of Volumes in Books,
see Prefatory note at beginning of Index.

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William and Mary, College of, xi,

265.
William of Champeaux. (1070-

1121.) French scholastic phi-

losopher, vii, 30, 35, 36.
William of Lorris. - (Died about

1260.) French trouvère, xiii,

295.
William of Nassau.-viii, 270. See

William the Silent.
William of Orange. - V, 285. See

William III of England.
William of Saint Amour.-V, 234.
William of Wykeham. (1324

1404.) English prelate and
statesman, theme: “Gothic Arch-
itecture," V, 361; historical de-
velopments of church architec-
ture of Middle Ages, 362; the
ancient Basilica, 364, 365; trans-
ition from the basilica to the
Gothic church-the Romanesque,
366; monastic buildings, con-
vents and retreats, 368-370;
brighter influence of the Cru-
sades, 371-374; the “Gothic,”
375; Winchester Cathedral, and
its builder, Wm. of Wykeham,
377; Salisbury, York, Glouces.
ter, and Westminster, 377, 378;
new era sets in with Michael
Angelo, 380; St. Peter's, Rome,
and St. Paul's, London, 291;
mixture of Greek and Gothic,
382; architecture turned into
great feats of engineering, 383;

church for liturgical ser
vices or for pulpit eloquence ?
385; church edifice to be
adapted to the end designed,
386; design of the Protestant
church, 387; a church for the
poor as well as for the opulent,

388.
William Rufus.-King of England

(1087-1100), V, 180, 182, 192,
259, 336.

Williams, Dr. S. Wells.-Chinese

secretary to the U. S. Minister

at Peking, xiv, 280.
Williams, John. ( 1582-1650.)

English prelate and statesman,

V, 406.
Williamsburg, Va., House

of
Burgesses meets in, xi, 266.
William the Conqueror. (1028-

87.) King of England (1066-
87), V, 171, 175; vi, 242; xiii,

137.
William the Silent. (1533-84.)

Prince of Orange and first stadt.
holder of the Netherlands, V,
107; vi, 378, 430; viii, 159;

ix, 131, 282; xi, 29, 126, 229.
Wilmot, David W., of Penn., xii,

133.
Wilson, James.-(1742-92.) Ameri-

can jurist, xi, 156.
Wilson, John, “Christopher North.”

· (1785-1854.) Moral philoso-
phy professor, xiii, 246, 276.
Wilson, Woodrow. (1856 - 1924.)

President of the United States,
xvi; family history, 15, 16;
education, 17, 18; professor at
Princeton,

President of
Princeton, 18; son and grand-
son of the Manse, 19; difficulty
in speaking, 19, 20; dealings
with Mexico, 20,

seeks
beauty in method as in logic, 22,
23; artistic temperament, 23;
gains reputation of “a political
ingrate,” 23, 24; recreation, 25;
refuses interview to Viscount
Grey, 27, 28; inability of, to
work with other men, 28-30;
an International Liberal, 30;
political code is strong belief
that mankind is divided into
sheep and goats everywhere, 30-
33; Democratic party only
weapon of, 33, 34; reduces
tariff, 34; establishes Federal

18;

22;

a

Roman numerals refer to Volumes. For location of Volumes in Books,
see Prefatory note at beginning of Index.

-

9

Reserve Banks, 34; equalizes
Panama Tolls, 34; takes over
Income Tax, 34; puts through
the Adamson Law, 34; disap-
proves of Coalitions, 34, 35; ex-
cludes Roosevelt from employ-
ment, 35; exiles General Leon-
ard Wood to unimportant camp,
35, 36; "snubs" William
Howard Taft, 36-38;

attitude
toward relations between the
U. S. and England, 37; part in
elections of 1916 and 1918, 38,
39; acts on his own initiative,
40;

declares United States
neutral, 40, 41; addresses
notes of protest to Britain and
Germany, 41, 42; coins phrase
“too proud to fight,” 43; asks
combatants to state respective
aims, 43, 44; breaks relations
with Germany, 44, 45; seeks
Congressional authority for
armed neutrality, 45, 46; policy
provokes dissent in two respects,
46, 47; hopes to secure equitable
and lasting peace, 48;

under-
stands Lloyd George and Clem-
enceau, 49, 50; his Fourteen
Points accepted as basis
peace, 51-58; demands cancella-
tion of all secret treaties, 53, 55;
proposes League of Nations, 58;
agrees to joint guarantee of
French frontier, 49, 60; loses
his Liberal bodyguard, 60, 61;
hope in the supreme will of the
people, 62; illness, 62; keeps
country from war with Mexico,
63; refuses to compromise with
the Senate over reservations to
Covenant of League of Nations,

Gardiner, bishop of, 273; viii,

69; Henry of, V, 269.
Windsor Castle, Macaulay at, xiii,

279.
Winslow, John F., aids Ericsson's

projects financially, xiv, 219.
“Winter Evening's Tale," Shak-

speare's, xiii, 312.
Wirt, William. (1772-1834.)

American lawyer and orator, xi,
277, 304, 349; xii, 78, 150,

153.
Wisdom, King Solomon prays for

and is granted, ii, 204.
Wissmann, Herrmann von.

of

term of Presidency over,
63; desires to enter Senate, 63,

64; dignity of, 64.
Winchester, Bishop Fox, vi, 259;

(1853- .) German explorer and
commander in Africa, xiv, 323,

334.
Wittenberg, Luther affixes his

theses at the gates of, vi, 226,

227, 336.
Witwatersrand, Mines of, at Johan-

nesburg, Africa, xiv, 343, 345.
Wives and Concubines, Solomon's,

ii, 209.
“Wizard of the North, The" (Sir

W. Scott), xiii, 65.
Wolf, F. August. (1759-1824.)

German classical scholar, “Pro-

legomena,” xiii, 422.
Wolsey, Thomas, Cardinal.—(1471.

1530.) English statesman, vi,

257, 267; vii, 202.
Woman, Education of, vii, 299.

See More, Hannah.
Woman, Political, The, vii, 145.

See Maintenon, Mme. de.
Woman as friend, type of, Paula,

Roman lady of rank and
wealth, iv, 173. See Paula.
Woman as Novelist, vii, 345. See

Eliot, George.
Woman as Sovereign (Queen Eliza-

beth), viii, 65. See Queen Eliza-

beth.
Woman in Literature, vii, 265.

See Staël, Mme. de.

>

а.

63;

Roman numerals refer to Volumes. For location of Volumes in Books,
seo Prefatory note at beginning of Index.

-

Worcester, Roger of. V, 270.
Wordsworth, William. (1770-

1850.) English poet, ix, 271;
xiii, 87, 90, 95, 96, 439, 453,

457, 460; xiv, 95.
Working Men's College, London,

xiv, 108.
Worldliness of Jesuit dignitaries,

vi, 319.
Worms, Diet of, Luther at, vi, 168,

250, 340; ix, 159.
Worms, Henry IV summons coun-

cil of German bishops at, v, 123.
Worth, Battle of (1870), x, 242.
Wotton, Sir Henry.-(1568-1630.)

English scholar and diplomat,

xiii, 299, 336.
Wren, Sir Christopher. (1631.

1723.) English architect, builds
St. Paul's Cathedral, London, V,

381.
Wright, Orville.-(1871- .) Amer-

ican co-inventor of the airplane,
xvi, 283; family history, 283;
boyhood, 283, 284; interest of,
in problem of flight, 286, 287;
school of thought on aviation,
287, 288; early experiments,
288-291; discovers control sys-
tem, 290, 291; designs man:
carrying glider, 293-297;
sults of first experiments, 297,
298;

re-

Woman of Paganisin (Cleopatra),
iii, 311; attractive

but im-
moral, 335; malign influence of
Paganism on, 337-345; effect of

Christianity on, 346.
Woman of Society, vii, 227. Seei

Récamier, Mme.
Woman of the World, The, vii, 181.

See Marlborough, Duchess of.
Women, Dream of Fair,” Tenny.

son's, xiii, 453.
Women, Heroic, vii, 69.
Women, Jewish, more favored and

honored in Greece and Rome
than the sex of other nationali-

ties, iv, 174, 175.
"Women, Legend of Good,” Chau.

cer's, vi, 73.
Women, new position, xii, 428.
Women, Notable, of Greece and

Rome, iv, 176.
Wonder, Daughter of, xiii, 302.
Wood, Charles.-English politician,

X, 66.
Wood, Leonard.—(1860- .) Amer-

ican general and administrator,
friendship with Roosevelt, XV,

79.
Woodberry, Prof. Geo. E.

(1855- .) His edition of Ten-
nyson's "The Princess,” xiii,

458.
Woodbury, Levi (1789-1851), of

N. H. American jurist and
statesman, Secretary of the
Navy (1831-34) in Jackson's

Cabinet, xii, 53, 63.
Woodhouselee, Lord. Scotch

jurist, xiii, 73.
Woolner, Thomas. (1826-92.)

English sculptor, xiv, 88.
Woolwich, Royal Artillery Institu-

tion at, xiv, 102.
Worcester, Battle of (1651), viii,

158, 228.
Worcester, Mass., John Adams

teaches school at, xi, 218.

builds two testing ma-
chines, 298, 299; designs
powered

machine, 300-304;
makes first trial flight, 305;
abandons all other business, 308;
fails to enthuse War Department,

experiments cause sensa-
tion in Europe, 310, 311; carries
on negotiations with foreign
governments, 311, 312; demon-
strates contract machine, 313;
quiet life, 313, 314; personal
character, 314; first serious
accident, 314, 315; invention
becomes
government

property,

309;

Roman numerals refer to Volumes. For location of Volumes in Books,
see Prefatory note at beginning of Index.

316; courage and dangers of,
316, 317; difficulties in business,
319, 320; compared with brother
Wilbur, 320, 321; receives com-
mission during war, 321; great-

ness of work, 321-324.
Wright, Wilbur. - (1867-1912.)

American co-inventor of the air-
plane, xvi, 283; family history,
283; boyhood,' 283, 284; be-
comes editor of weekly news-
paper, 285; interest in problem
of flight, 286, 287; school of
thought on aviation, 287, 288;
early experiments, 288-291; dis-
covers control system, 290, 291;
designs man-carrying glider, 293-
297; results of first experiments,
297, 298; builds two testing
machines, 298, 299; designs
powered machine, 300-304;
makes trial fights, 306, 307;
abandons all other business, 307;
fails to enthuse War Department,
309; experiments cause sensa-
tion in Europe, 310, 311; carries

negotiations with foreign
governments, 311, 312; negoti-
ates with War Department, 312,
313; quiet life, 313, 314; in-
vention becomes government
property, 316; 'courage

"Dawn of the Reformation," 1,
393; corruptions that crept into
institutions of the Church in
Middle Ages, 394; the Papacy
and powers and prerogatives of
the Popes in England in Wy.
clif's time, 395; sale of church
preferments and tribute (Peter's
pence, etc.) forced on nation,
396; increase of Mendicant
friars to uphold Papal domina-
tion, 396; sale of indulgences
and pious frauds, 397; con.
vents and religious houses de.
vour substance of the poor, 398;
vices of clergy and corruptions
in Church doctrine, 398; birth,
education, and attainments of
Wyclif, 399, 400; rector of
Fillingham and a "don” of the
University

of

Oxford, 401;
attacks abuses of the Church,
and becomes head of

on

and
dangers of, 316, 317; flies in
France, 317, 318; physical
characteristics, 318, 319; makes
historic flight, 319; difficulties
in business, 319, 320; death,
320;

compared with brother
Orville, 320, 321; greatness of

work, 321-324.
Writs of Assistance (against Amer-

ican liberties), resistance to Eng.

lish, xi, 48, 77, 223.
Würtemberg, Kingdom of, South

Germany, ix, 164, 170.
Wyclif, John. — (1324-84.) Eng-

lish religious reformer, theme:

Canter
bury Hall, appointment voided
by Langham and ratified by the
Pope, 403; in political life,
404; leads opposition against
the Pope's interference with
ecclesiastical livings in England,
405; friendship of his

pro-
tector John of Gaunt, 405; his
treatise on the “Regimen of the
Church,” 406; Parliament's
assault on pontifical exactions
and pretensions, 407; Wyclif
accused as a pertinacious
heretic, 407; subject of a papel
bull, appears at Lambeth to an.
swer his accusers, 408, 409; pre-
ceedings dropped, 410;

his
translation of the Bible, 412;
version prohibited, 414; de-
nounces the eucharist and mys.
teries of Catholic faith, 419;
death, 420; labors and services
as pioneer of reform in England,

Roman numerals refer to Volumes. For location of Volumes in Books.
see Prefatory note at beginning of Index.

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