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" I may be positive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in them, and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction between man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to. "
Natural history sketches among the carnivora: wild and domesticated - Page 196
by Arthur Nicols - 1885
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Works, Volume 1

John Locke - 1722
...that way to any degree; this, I think, I may be pbfitive in, that the1 Jtntf netpower of Abftra&ing is not at all in them; and that the having of general Ideas, is that which pats a perfeft diftinition betwixt Man and Brutes, and is an ExYeL f. I i cellency Idiots and Madmen,...
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Disquisitions Relating to Matter and Spirit: To which is Added the History ...

Joseph Priestley - 1777 - 356 pages
..."This, I think, I may " be pofitive in, that the power of abjiraSlion ""is not at all in them, arid that the having ** of general ideas is that which puts a perfect " diftinftion between men and brutes. For " it is evident we obferve no footfteps in'' " them of making...
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Disquisitions Relating to Matter and Spirit, Volume 1

Joseph Priestley - 1782
...that of Mr. Locke, who fays, " This, I think, I may " be pofitive in, that the power of abjtraStlon " is not at all in them, and that the having " of general ideas is that which puts a perfect " diftinction between men and brutes. For " it is evident, we obferve no footfteps in " them of...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Volume 1

John Locke - 1796 - 459 pages
...compound and enlarge their ideas ftradTnot." that way to any degree; this, I think, I may be poiitive in, that the power of abstracting is not at all in...having of general ideas, is that which puts a perfect diftin&ion betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: With Thoughts on the ..., Volumes 1-3

John Locke - 1801 - 308 pages
...their ideas that way to any degree ; this I think I may be pofitivc in, that the power of abJlraEling is not at all in them; and that the having of general ideas, is that which puts a perfect diftinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculty of brutes do by no means...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding; with Thoughts on the ..., Volume 1

John Locke - 1801 - 308 pages
...their ideas that way to any degree ; this I think I may be pofitive in, that the power of abftracling is not at all in them ; and that the having of general ideas, is that which pats a perfect diftinction betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculty of brutes...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding: With Thoughts on the Conduct of ...

John Locke - 1801 - 308 pages
...their ideas that way to any degree ; this I think I may be pofitive in, that the power of abJlraStjng is not at all in them ; and that the having of general ideal, is that which puts a perfect diftinc~t,ion betwixt man and brutes, and is an excellency which...
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An essay concerning human understanding. Also extr. from the author's works ...

John Locke - 1815
...made. If it may be doubted, whether beasts compound and enlarge their ideas that way to any degree; this, I think, I may be positive in, that the power...ideas, is that which puts a perfect distinction betwixt roan and brutes, and is an excellency which the faculties of brutes do by no means attain to. For it...
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British Encyclopedia: Or, Dictionary of Arts and Sciences ..., Volume 2

William Nicholson - 1819
...that the souls of brutes are wholly material ; that they do not possess the power of abstraction ; and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction between men and brutes. Accordingly he supposes that they have no use of words, or nny general signs,...
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American Edition of the British Encyclopedia: Or, Dictionary of ..., Volume 2

William Nicholson - 1819
...that the souls of brutes are wholly material ; that they do not possess the power of abstraction ; and that the having of general ideas is that which puts a perfect distinction between men and brutes. Accordingly he supposes that they have no use of words, or any general signs,...
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