Shakespeare's Centurie of Prayse: Being Materials for a History of Opinion on Shakespeare and His Works, Culled from Writers of the First Century After His Rise

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For the editor, printed by J. Allen of Birmingham & pub. by Trübner & Company, 1874 - 362 pages

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Page 280 - Why should that name be sounded more than yours? Write them together, yours is as fair a name; Sound them, it doth become the mouth as well; Weigh them, it is as heavy; conjure with 'em, Brutus will start a spirit as soon as Caesar.
Page 72 - O that Ben Jonson is a pestilent fellow ; he brought up Horace, giving the poets a pill ; but our fellow Shakespeare hath given him a purge, that made him bewray his credit.
Page 247 - All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously but luckily: when he describes anything you more than see it, you feel it too. Those who accuse him to have wanted learning, give him the greater commendation: he was naturally learned; he needed not the spectacles of books to read Nature; he looked inwards, and found her there.
Page xv - With neither of them that take offence was I acquainted ; and with one of them, I care not if I never be...
Page 165 - So that the sum of all is, ready writing makes not good writing, but good writing brings on ready writing.
Page 17 - Midsummers night dreame, and his Merchant of Venice; for tragedy, his Richard the 2, Richard the 3, Henry the 4, King John, Titus Andronicus and his Romeo and Juliet.
Page 106 - I behold like a Spanish great galleon and an English man-of-war. Master Coleridge, like the former, was built far higher in learning, solid, but slow in his performances. CVL, with the English man-of-war, lesser in bulk, but lighter in sailing, could turn with all tides, tack about, and take advantage of all winds, by the quickness of his wit and invention.
Page 177 - Philomel, with melody Sing in our sweet lullaby ; Lulla, lulla, lullaby, lulla, lulla, lullaby : Never harm, Nor spell nor charm, Come our lovely lady nigh ; So, good night, with lullaby.
Page 135 - SHAKE-SPEARE, at length thy pious fellowes give The world thy Workes: thy Workes, by which, out-live Thy Tombe, thy name must: when that stone is rent, And Time dissolves thy Stratford Moniment, Here we alive shall view thee still.
Page 87 - ... otherwise, and he by death departed from that right, we pray you do not envie his friends the office of their care and paine to have collected and publish'd them...

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