Lord Byron: Don Juan

Front Cover
In this rambling, exuberant, conversational poem, the travels of Don Juan are used as a vehicle for some of the most lively and acute commentaries on human societies and behaviour in the language. The manner is what Goethe called 'a cultured comic language' - a genre which he regarded as not possible in German and which he felt Byron managed superbly. This edition is itself a significant contribution to Byron scholarship. The editors have been able to draw on their authoritative edition of the poem published by the University of Texas Press. The extensive annotation covers points of difficulty, selected variant readings and a mass of information on the historical allusions which Byron wove into the poem. Book jacket.
 

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Contents

VIII
37
IX
41
X
46
XI
102
XII
157
XIII
189
XIV
219
XV
259
XXI
375
XXII
397
XXIII
420
XXIV
443
XXV
471
XXVI
497
XXVII
522
XXVIII
555

XVI
261
XVII
264
XVIII
295
XIX
317
XX
353
XXIX
559
XXX
561
XXXI
756
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About the author (1977)

George Gordon Byron was born on January 22, 1788 and he inherited the barony in 1798. He went to school in Dulwich, and then in 1801 to Harrow. In 1805 he went up to Trinity College, Cambridge, later gaining a reputation in London for his startling good looks and extravagant behavior. His first collection of poems, Hours of Idleness (1807), was not well received, but with the publication of the first two cantos of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage (1812) he became famous overnight and increased this fame with a series of wildly popular 'Eastern Tales'. In 1815 he married the heiress Annabella Milbanke, but they were separated after a year. Byron shocked society by the rumored relationship with his half-sister, Augusta, and in 1816 he left England forever. He eventually settled in Italy, where he lived for some time with Teresa, Contessa Guiccioli. He supported Italian revolutionary movements and in 1823 he left for Greece to fight in its struggle for independence, but he contracted a fever and died at Missolonghi in 1824.

Byron's contemporary popularity was based first on Childe Harold and the 'Tales', and then on Don Juan (1819-24), his most sophisticated and accomplished writing. He was one of the strongest exemplars of the Romantic movement, and the Byronic hero was a prototype widely imitated in European and American literature.

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