Voices of Nature to Her Foster-child, the Soul of Man: A Series of Analogies Between the Natural and the Spiritual World

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C. Scribner, 1852 - 430 pages
 

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Page 23 - To them I may have owed another gift, Of aspect more sublime ; that blessed mood, In which the burthen of the mystery, In which the heavy and the weary weight Of all this unintelligible world, Is lightened...
Page 24 - All thinking things, all objects of all thought, And rolls through all things. Therefore am I still A lover of the meadows and the woods, ' And mountains ; and of all that we behold From this green earth; of all the mighty world Of eye and ear, both what they half create *, And what perceive...
Page 319 - Blessed is the man that trusteth in the Lord, and whose hope the Lord is : For he shall be as a tree planted by the waters, and that spreadeth out her roots by the river, and shall not see when heat cometh, but her leaf shall be green ; and shall not be careful in the year of drought, neither shall cease from yielding fruit.
Page 69 - And he said also to the people, When ye see a cloud rise out of the west, straightway ye say, There cometh a shower ; and so it is. 55 And when ye see the south wind blow, ye say, There will be heat; and it cometh to pass.
Page 12 - Wordsworth on the other hand, |was to propose to himself as his object, to give the charm of novelty to things of every day, and to excite a feeling analogous to the supernatural by awakening the mind's attention from the lethargy of custom and directing it to the loveliness and the wonders of the world before us...
Page 229 - For the earth which drinketh in the rain that cometh oft upon it, and bringeth forth herbs meet for them by whom it is dressed, receiveth blessing from God ; but that which beareth thorns and briers is rejected, and is nigh unto cursing; whose end is to be burned.
Page 24 - Nature never did betray The heart that loved her; 'tis her privilege, Through all the years of this our life, to lead From joy to joy: for she can so inform The mind that is within us, so impress With quietness and beauty, and so feed With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues, Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men, Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all The dreary intercourse of daily life, Shall e'er prevail against us, or disturb Our cheerful faith that all which we behold Is...
Page 275 - And, because the breath of flowers is far sweeter in the air (where it comes and goes like the warbling of music) than in the hand, therefore nothing is more fit for that delight than to know what be the flowers and plants that do best perfume the air.
Page 161 - Before I understood this place Appointed for my second race, Or taught my soul to fancy aught But a white, celestial thought; When yet I had not walked above A mile or two from my first love, And looking back (at that short space) Could see a glimpse of his bright face...
Page 394 - Who hath divided a watercourse for the overflowing of waters Or a way for the lightning of thunder; To cause it to rain on the earth, where no man is; On the wilderness, wherein there is no man; To satisfy the desolate and waste ground; And to cause the bud of the tender herb to spring forth?

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