Re-union of the Sons and Daughters of Newport, R. I., August 23, 1859

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F. A. Pratt, City Printers, 1859 - 297 pages
 

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Page 7 - So murmur'd the trees in my homeward track, As they play'd to the mountain-wind. " Hath thy soul been true to its early love ? " Whisperd my native streams ; " Hath the spirit nursed amidst hill and grove, Still revered its first high dreams...
Page 124 - It is the will and command of God, that, since the coming of His Son the Lord Jesus, a permission of the most paganish, Jewish, Turkish or Antichristian consciences and worships be granted to all men in all Nations and Countries: and they are only to be fought against with that sword which is only (in soul matters) able to conquer, to wit the sword of God's Spirit, the Word of God.
Page 220 - And Gilpin, long live he; And when he next doth ride abroad, May I be there to see ! AN EPISTLE TO A PROTESTANT LADY IN FRANCE.
Page 110 - LADIES AND GENTLEMEN. I thank you from the bottom of my heart for the great, the signal honour, which you have conferred upon me by electing me to preside over your deliberations this year.
Page 247 - In 1813 Solomon Southwick, esq., of Albany, gave to the library one hundred and twenty acres of land, in the State of New York, for, the purpose of advancing the institution, and thereby perpetuating the memory of Henry Collins, esq., one of its principal founders. "In 1834 Abraham Redwood, esq., of Dorset Place, Marylebone, England, being desirous of promoting an institution founded by his honored grandfather, gave to the...
Page 245 - J"500 sterling towards a university proposed to be .erected in this town ; and he offered the same sum to the Society of Friends, of which he was a member, to endow a school in this place for the instruction of Friends' children. His less public acts of generosity will be gratefully remembered by those on whom they were conferred; and the poor will never forget that Abraham Redwood was their constant friend and benefactor.
Page 246 - Friends' children. His less public acts of generosity will be gratefully remembered by those on whom they were conferred ; and the poor will never forget that Abraham Redwood was their constant friend and benefactor." It is understood that Mr. Redwood removed to Newport from Antigua, where he possessed large and valuable estates. After his death, the public interest in the prosperity of the Institution seems to have declined. A period of great success in the commerce of the town...
Page 121 - Of Law there can be no lefs acknowledged, than that her feat is the bofom of God, her voice the harmony of the world : all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very leaft as feeling her care, and the greateft as not exempted from her power...
Page 113 - ... out-cafts, a few years ago, not fo much fent as thrown out, on the bleak and barren more of a defolate wildernefs three thoufand miles from all civilized intercourfe. All this was done by England, whilft England purfued trade, and forgot revenue. You not only acquired commerce, but you actually created the very objects of trade in America ; and by that creation you raifed the trade...
Page 207 - Store-houses with the merchandize of every clime; while in yonder Synagogue, they worshipped the God of Abraham. So eminent was the position of Newport in Colonial times, that antiquarians tell us that letters for New York from Europe, in order to reach that modest seashore town, are known to have been directed to " New York near Newport Rhode Island.

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