The Children's own paper, ed. by uncle Gilbert, Volumes 5-6

Front Cover
Gilbert (uncle, pseud)
1884

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Page 402 - So here hath been dawning Another blue Day: Think wilt thou let it Slip useless away. Out of Eternity This new Day is born ; Into Eternity, At night, will return. Behold it aforetime No eye ever did : So soon it forever From all eyes is hid. Here hath been dawninoAnother blue Day: ' : Think wilt thou let it Slip useless away.
Page 3 - Yet, ere we part, one lesson I can leave you For every day. Be good, sweet maid, and let who will be clever ; Do noble things, not dream them, all day long : And so make life, death, and that vast for-ever One grand, sweet song.
Page 409 - Little by little," said a thoughtful boy, " Moment by moment, I'll well employ, Learning a little every day, And not spending all my time in play. And still this rule in my mind shall dwell :' Whatever I do, I will do it well.' Little by little, I'll learn to know The treasured wisdom of long ago ; And one of these days perhaps we'll see That the world will be the better for me.
Page 78 - Two words, Indeed, of praying we remember, And at midnight's hour of harm, 'Our Father," looking upward in the chamber, We say softly for a charm. We know no other words except 'Our Father,' And we think that, in some pause of angels...
Page 25 - For e'en though vanquished, he could argue still ; While words of learned length and thundering sound Amazed the gazing rustics ranged around. And still they gazed, and still the wonder grew, That one small head could carry all he knew.
Page 40 - I* THINK, when I read that sweet story of old, When Jesus was here among men, How He called little children, as lambs to His fold, I should like to have been with them then.
Page 279 - BETWEEN the dark and the daylight, When the night is beginning to lower, Comes a pause in the day's occupations, That is known as the Children's Hour. I hear in the chamber above me The patter of little feet, The sound of a door that is opened, And voices soft and sweet. From my study I see in the lamplight, Descending the broad hall stair, Grave Alice, and laughing Allegra, And Edith with golden hair. A whisper, and then a silence...
Page 149 - She wanders lowing here and there, And yet she cannot stray, All in the pleasant open air, The pleasant light of day; And blown by all the winds that pass And wet with all the showers, She walks among the meadow grass And eats the meadow flowers.
Page 40 - I wish that His hands had been placed on my head, That His arms had been thrown around me, And that I might have seen His kind look when He said, " Let the little ones come unto me.
Page 87 - And the first time, I will send A white rosebud for a guerdon, And the second time, a glove ; But the third time I may bend From my pride, and answer ' Pardon, If he comes to take my love.

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