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Books Books 1 - 10 of 95 on As among these, so among primitive men, the ' weakest and stupidest went to the wall,....
" As among these, so among primitive men, the ' weakest and stupidest went to the wall, while the toughest and shrewdest, those who were best fitted to cope with their circumstances, but not the best in any other sense, survived. Life was a continual free... "
Natural Religion: The Gifford Lectures Delivered Before the University of ... - Page 242
by Friedrich Max Müller - 1889 - 608 pages
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The Popular Science Monthly, Volume 32

1888
...conclusion that, for thousands and thousands of years, before the orgin of the oldest known civilizations, men were savages of a very low type. They strove with...water as it best might, and thinking neither of whence nor whither. ' The history of civilization — that is, of society — on the other hand, is the record...
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The Library Magazine

1888
...and died, for thousands of generations, alongside the mammoth, the urus, the lion, and the hyaena, whose lives were spent in the same way ; and they...water as it best might, and thinking neither of whence nor whither. The history of civilization — that is of society — on the other hand, is the record...
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Congregationalism; free, broad & evangelical: an address, Volume 1

Robert Bruce - 1888
...hairy compatriots." There is nothing to " make a joyful noise " about in that human species, " which, like others, plashed and floundered amid the general...water, as it best might, and thinking neither of whence nor whither." But we walk more erect, and sing a nobler strain, when we can take up the old song of...
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The Nineteenth Century, Volume 28

1890
...to cope with their circumstances, but not the best in another way, survived. Life was a continuous free fight, and beyond the limited and temporary relations...Hobbesian war of each against all was the normal state of existence.3 In how far this view of nature is supported by fact, will be seen from the evidence which...
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Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, Volume 52; Volume 115

John Holmes Agnew, Henry T. Steele, Walter Hilliard Bidwell - 1890
...with their circumstances, but not the best in another way, survived. Life was a continuous free tight, and beyond the limited and temporary relations of...each against all was the normal state of existence.* In how far this view of nature is supported by fact, will be seen from the evidence which will be here...
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The Nineteenth Century, Volume 28

1890
...to cope with their circumstances, but not the best in another way, survived. Life was a continuous free fight, and beyond the limited and temporary relations of the family, the Ilobbesian war of each against all was the normal state of existence. 2 In how far this view of nature...
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Social Diseases and Worse Remedies: Letters to the "Times" on Mr. Booth's ...

Thomas Henry Huxley - 1891 - 128 pages
...stint, and died, for thousands of generations alongside the mammoth, the urus, the lion, and the hyaena, whose lives were spent in the same way ; and they...water as it best might, and thinking neither of whence nor whither. The history of civilization-—that is of society—on the other hand, is the record of...
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The Twentieth Century, Volume 29

1891
...existence to its bitter end, and living a life of ' continual free fight ' ; to quote his own words — 'beyond the limited and temporary relations of the...each against all was the normal state of existence.' * It has been remarked more than once that the chief error of Hobbes and the eighteenth-century philosophers...
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The Study of Animal Life

John Arthur Thomson - 1892 - 375 pages
...Kropotkinifs Position. — Against Prof. Huxley's conclusion that " Life was a continual free-fight, and beyond the limited and temporary relations of...each against all was the normal state of existence," let me place that of Kropotkine, to whose admirable discussion of mutual aid among animals I again...
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McClure's Magazine, Volume 3

1894
...to be praised or blamed, on moral grounds, than their less erect and more hairy compatriots. . . . Life was a continual free fight, and, beyond the limited...like others, plashed and floundered amid the general scheme of evolution, keeping its head above water as best it might, and thinking neither of whence...
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