Letters and Speeches of the Honorable John F. Fitzgerald: Mayor of Boston, 1906-07, 1910-13

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Printing Department, 1914 - 166 pages

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Page 30 - His house was known to all the vagrant train ; He chid their wanderings, but relieved their pain.
Page 30 - Thus to relieve the wretched was his pride, And e'en his failings leaned to virtue's side; But in his duty, prompt at every call, He watched and wept, he prayed and felt for all; And, as a bird each fond endearment tries To tempt its new-fledged offspring to the skies, He tried each art, reproved each dull delay, Allured to brighter worlds, and led the way.
Page 30 - At church, with meek and unaffected grace, His looks adorned the venerable place; Truth from his lips prevailed with double sway, And fools, who came to scoff, remained to pray.
Page 30 - Whose beard descending swept his aged breast : The ruin'd spendthrift, now no longer proud, Claim'd kindred there, and had his claims allow'd : The broken soldier, kindly bade to stay, Sat by his fire, and talk'd the night away ; Wept o'er his wounds, or, tales of sorrow done, Shoulder'd his crutch, and show'd how fields were won.
Page 21 - The soldiers' revels in the midst of pillage ; The wail of famine in beleaguered towns ; The bursting shell, the gateway wrenched asunder, The rattling musketry, the clashing blade ; And ever and anon, in tones of thunder, The diapason of the cannonade.
Page 30 - The long-remembered beggar was his guest, Whose beard descending swept his aged breast; The ruined spendthrift, now no longer proud, Claimed kindred there, and had his claims allowed; The broken soldier, kindly bade to stay, Sat by his fire and talked the night away; Wept o'er his wounds, or, tales of sorrow done, Shouldered his crutch and showed how fields were won.
Page 52 - ... to secure the honest, efficient, and economical conduct of the entire executive and administrative business of the city, and the harmonious and concerted action of the different departments.
Page 151 - I put on righteousness, and it clothed me; my justice was like a robe and a turban. I was eyes to the blind, and feet to the lame. I was a father to the poor, and I searched out the cause of him whom I did not know.
Page 164 - I love consists in finding out wherein subjects are aggrieved, in relieving them, in studying the temper and genius of a people, in consulting their prejudices, in selecting proper persons to lead and manage them, in the laborious, watchful, and difficult task of increasing public happiness by allaying each particular discontent.
Page 151 - The blessing of him that was ready to perish came upon me : and I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy. I put on righteousness, and it clothed me : my judgment was as a robe and a diadem.

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