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and speedily will be published by HENRY COLBURN, PUBLIC LIBRARY,

CONDUIT STREET, LONDON.

THE SPIRIT OF CHRISTIANITY;

OR, BEAUTIES OF THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION.

BY F. A. DE CHATEAUBRIAND, Author of “ Travels in Greece and Palestine,” “ Atala,” &c. Translated from the French by FREDERIC SHOBERL; with

a Preface and Notes by the Rev. HENRY KETT, of Trinity College, Oxford. 4 vols. 8vo.

THE MARTYRS;

OR, THE TRIUMPH OF CHRISTIANITY.

By the same Author. 3 vols,

A DICTIONARY

OF ALL THE

LIVING AUTHORS of the BRITISH EMPIRE;

CONTAINING, 1. Biographical Particulars of each Writer ; II. A complete Catalogue of their respective Works, with Remarks.

At an æra when the influence of literature is so widely diffused through all classes of society, and when every person of liberal education and refined habits takes more or less interest in the productions of the press and the history of their Authors; it would be needless to expatiate on the utility and importance of the Work here proposed. Those who are acquainted with the extreme imperfection of former attempts of this nature, and the length of time which has since elapsed, must be aware of the difficulty of the present undertaking, which is farther increased by the continually augmenting number of writers and persons devoted to literary pursuits. "The Publisher therefore, in order to render his work as perfect and as complete as possible, earnestly solicits Authors, Booksellers, and all who feel interested in the accuracy of the intended Publication, to favour him with information on the subjects which it is designed to embrace; and he anticipates their assistance with the greater confidence, as they must be sensible that this will be the most effectual method of preventing error and misrepresentation.

Communications (post paid) are requested to be addressed to Mr. COLBURN, English and Foreign Public Library, 50, Conduit Street, Hanover Square, London.

PRINTED FOR HENRY COLBURN,
PUBLIC LIBRARY, CONDUIT STREET, LONDON ;

and may also be had of
JOHN ANDERSON, EDINBURGH, AND JOHN

CUMMING, DUBLIN.

A CRITICAL INQUIRY

INTO THE

VARIOUS SYSTEMS

OP

POLITICAL ECONOMY;

Their Advantages and Disadvantages; and the Theory most favorable to the Increase of National

Wealth.
BY CHARLES GANILH, ADVOCATE.

One large Volume, 8vo. price 12s. 6d. boards.
This is undoubtedly the best treatise on Political Economy that has
appeared since that of Turgot.
See Sir Francis D'Ivernois' last work, Napoleon, Administrateur, &c. Page 90.

The objects of this work are the nature of Wealth, the sources, the increase, and the history of this article of universal desire. To explain and illustrate his purpose, the author examines the mercantile system, the agricultural system, the monetary system, &c. He inquires into the relative value of labour, employed in agriculture, or in manufactures and commerce, the means of invigorating labour, its progress, and the means by which that progress is opposed. He treats on capitals, profits, values, money, credit, banks, corporations, or companies ; colonies, exchanges and national income; with various other subjects incidentally connected with the train of his general reasoning.

T'he mere enumeration of these particulars is sufficient to shew the importance of this work. It deserves the most thorough investigation, for the author does not blindly follow any leader; he agrees on many points with our countryman ADAM Smith; on others he totally dissents from him. He has studied Hume, Montesquieu, Petty, Davenant, and various other writers, some of them too little known; but after all he forms his own opinion, and that is completely favorable to the doctrine of “ ships, colonies, and commerce."

See the literary Panorama, Universal Magazine, &c.

MEMOIRS OF PRINCE EUGENE OF SAVOY.

Written by himself. Translated from the original edition, containing the whole of the passages suppressed by order of the French Government. The Second Edition, enlarged: with an Introduction, containing private anecdotes of the Prince's Family, and other celebrated Characters ; and Notes, Historical, Political, Military, &c. Em. bellished with a Portrait and Fac-Simile. In 1 Vol. 8vo. Price 10s. 6d.

“We are admitted, in these memoirs,” say the Edinburgh Reviewers, “into the confidence of a statesman and a hero with whose life a very importa nt period of our history is closely connected. We are instructed by the candid recitals of a powerful mind viewing every object in a great and masterly style; disclosing the most secret causes of events; simplifying the apparent mysteries of court intrigues; doing justice to neglected or injured merit, and throwing the broad light of genius over the obscurest parts of his career.

PREFACE.

If I were to assert that these Travels were not intended to see the light; that I give them to the public with regret, and as it were in spite of myself, I should tell the truth, and probably nobody would believe me.

My tour was not undertaken with the intention of writing it; I had a very different design, and this design I have accomplished in the Martyrs*. I went in quest of images, and nothing more. I could not behold Sparta, Athens, Jerusalem, without making some reflections. Those reflections could not be introduced into the subject of an epopee; they were left in the journal which I kept of my tour, and it is these that I now submit to the public.

* Les Martyrs, ou le Triomphe de la Religion Chretienne, in

3 vols. 8vo.

I must, therefore, request the reader to consider this work rather as memoirs of a year of my life, than as a book of travels. I pretend not to tread in the steps of a Chardin, a Tavernier, a Chandler, a Mungo Park, a Humboldt; or to be thoroughly acquainted with people, through whose country I have merely passed. A moment is sufficient for a landscape-painter to sketch a tree, to take a view, to draw a ruin; but whole years are too short for the study of men and manners, and for the profound investigation of the arts and sciences.

I

am, nevertheless, fully aware of the respect that is due to the public, and, it would be wrong to imagine that I am here ushering into the world a work that has cost me no pains, no researches, no labour : it will be seen, on the contrary, that I have scrupulously fulfilled my duties as a writer. Had I done nothing but determine the site of Lacedæmon, discover a new tomb at Mycenæ, and ascertain the situation of the ports of Carthage, still I should deserve the gratitude of travellers.

In a work of this nature I have often been obliged to pass from the most serious reflections to

the most familiar circumstances: now indulging my reveries among the ruins of Greece, now returning to the cares incident to the traveller, my style has necessarily followed the train of my ideas and the change in my situation. All readers, therefore, will not be pleased with the same passages ; some will seek my sentiments only, while others will prefer my adventures : these will feel themselves obliged to me for the positive information I have communicated respecting a great number of objects; those again will be tired of the observations on the arts, the study of monuments, and the historical digressions. For the rest, it is the man much more than the author, that will be discovered throughout; I am continually speaking of myself, and I spoke, as I thought, in security, for I had no intention of publishing these Memoirs. But as I have nothing in my heart that I am ashamed to display to all the world, I have made no retrenchments from my original notes. The object which I have in view will be accomplished if the reader perceives a perfect sincerity from the beginning of the work to the end. A traveller is a kind of historian; it is his duty to give a faithful account of what he has seen or heard; he should invent nothing, but

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