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MINISTERIAL SUSTENTATION FUND

JOHN R. SUTHERLAND, D.D., Corresponding Secretary.

T

HE progress which this agency of our

Church has made during the past year

is a source of great gratification and entouragement to those upon whom the responsibility of carrying out its provisions rests. No agency of our Church during the first three years of its operations has made larger progress than this agency has made. It has fully justified the expectations of those who formulated the plan and the faith of those who welcomed it as a much-needed advance movement looking towards a better provision for the aged and disabled ministers of our Church, their widows and orphans.

There is already in the treasury of the Fund over $200,000 in cash and approved securities, and about $100,000 in good subscriptions.

Besides the cash, securities and time subscriptions in the treasury of the Fund, over forty people of large mtans have either already included it in their wills or signified their purpose to do so.

The Fund is already paying 30 per cent, of the full amount of the benefits, which percentage will be increased from time to time, in proportion to the increase in the funds secured toward the 80 per cent.

Those entrusted with the management of the Fund are entitled to the hearty co-operation of all the ministers of our Church and the cause for which it was established to the libera! support of the membership of the Church:

1. Because it is an agency of the Church, unanimously approved by the General Assembly of 1906, and suc

ucceeding Assemblies, and the plan, which was formulated by a special committee appointed by the General Assembly of 1902, was submitted to three previous Assemblies for consideration and approved by them.

2. The plan embraces the best features of the plans in successful operation in the Presbyterian churches of Scotland, Ireland, Canada and Australia.

3. Because the Fund is an annuity or pen

sion fund and is based upon well recognized economic principles :

(a) That the beneficiary of any pension fund should be a contributor to the Fund.

(b) That pensions should be based on length of service and a certain attained age of retirement and disability.

(c) That a pension fund should operate inmediateiy, automatically and continuously, in providing for the beneficiaries, in case of disability, old age or death, and without the humiliation of confessed want.

4. Because of the success which has so far attended the Fund, and the generous responses to the appeais made in its behalf by thousands of the liberal members of the Church. These responses are a guarantee that the Fund will accomplish the purpose for which it was established by the General Assembly, viz., to relieve the distressing financial condition in which many of our most faithful ministers find themselves when disabled or when reaching the age of retirement, and also to relieve the pressing needs of their dependent loved ones in the event of their death.

In view of the strong appeal which this Fund makes to the membership of our Church made acquainted with its object and provisions there should be no question as to the loyalty and support accorded it by the ministers in whose interest and for whose benefit it was established by the General Assembly. Had this advance movement failed no effort looking towards a better provision for the protection and support of the aged and disabled servants of our Church and those dependent upon them could be undertaken for many years to come. It is extremely doubtful if such a movement could be undertaken within the next fifty years.

It is not intended that this Fund should in any way interfere with the relief provided for them by the agency of the Church to which that special work has been committed, although the financial demands upon it for relief will naturally be lessening as the membership in this Fund increases and its financial resources are augmented.

THE COLLEGE BOARD

REV. ROBERT MACKENZIE, D.D., LL.D., Secretary

The Youth of the Church

I

N Athens, at a certain festival, the people

marched to the Acropolis in three sec

tions. First came the old men chanting of what they had done; then came the middleaged men chanting gravely of what they were doing; after them came the youth chanting buoyantly of what they were going to do. In such triple form do men move along through all ages. This number of the ASSEMBLY HERALD turns the eyes of the Church upon the third section—the youth of the Church.

The one thing on earth that made Christ home-sick for heaven was the sight of the children in the arms of their mothers; playing their games in the market place; singing hosannas in the temple. Always was He deeply moved by the sight of them, and that emotion found expression in the warm sentence that

came from His lips, "Of such is the Kingdom of Heaven."

He knew what it was to learn His own first lessons at His mother's knee; to go from that to the church school in the synagogue of Nazareth; to pass from that to a vision of higher education as, for a passing moment, we see Him asking and answering questions among the doctors in the temple school in Jerusalem. "When Israel was a child then I loved Him."

All real education must begin in the home. This is particularly so in respect to Christian education. "The father to the children shall make known Thy truth." The family tie includes all the important interests of life within its gracious bond. The influence of the home upon the children is immortal. The

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earliest anxiety of the home is the education of the children. From the time that the little one pores over a book wrong side up, until he comes home with his college diploma, the anxiety of the home as to his education is sleepless. What manner of man, of woman, is this child to be in this world and the next?

The more the father and mother have been denied the privilege of higher education in their own youth, the more intent they are that their children shall have that privilege. In the homes back of the large body of students in our schools and colleges there burn the fires of noblest ambition, of holiest hope, of costliest sacrifice, of most earnest prayer, that the children shall know the truth; that the truth shall make them free and forceful and honorable in this world and partakers of the joy of the world to come. How many mothers repeat the prayer of Zebedee's wife: "Grant that these my two sons may sit, the one on Thy right hand and the other on Thy left, in Thy Kingdom !" The initiative to many a man's life of conspicuous usefulness and honor lay in such a mother's prayer. Few reach such usefulness and honor without such a mother's prayer.

All schools beyond the home are established and supported by the home to assist them in leading the youth to a more comprehensive knowledge of themselves, of the world and of

God. It is a poor home education that does not lead the children to the Sunday schoolto that school in the temple where Christ asked and answered questions on his Father's business. The most sacred service the Church can do for the world is done in the Sunday school. Our Christian academies, our colleges, all our schools of higher learning were wellnigh empty of Christian results were it not for the groundwork of religious knowledge laid in the home and the Sunday school.

When the youth of the Church increase in stature, in wisdom and in age we find them in the high schools, in academies, in the preparatory departments of Christian colleges, which next to the home and the Sunday school hold the destinies of youth in their responsibility.

Separation of Church and State is a cardinal principle of our government. This was bought with a great price and must not be surrendered. This is generally interpreted to mean that the direct teaching of the Bible and of the Christian religion cannot be allowed in the public school. The Bible and Jesus Christ, the inspiration of our civilization, are taboo. The Christian school has therefore become and remains a permanent necessity; nor is there any place more favorable to confirm the young faith, to direct the nascent purposes of our youth; nor is there any place so well fitted to

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women whose names are recorded with those of the men who stood in the front rank of Christian service at home and abroad. We cannot contemplate their passing without regret nor their substitutes without anxiety. Their Christian work, however, is taken up by the preparatory departments of the Christian colleges of today-colleges which make it a matter of conscience that all youth coming under their influence shall be instructed in the Word of God, enlightened in the knowledge

What manner of men are these? Under what influences have they formed their life purpose? By what spirit have they been inspired in college? Can the home and the college follow them with pride? Can the Church of Christ say to both home and college “Behold I and the children which ye have given me!” A satisfactory answer to these questions depends largely on the prayers and benevolence of the churches and on the fidelity of the trustees and faculties of our colleges to the sacred trust assumed by them.

The Following Table of Carefully Ascertained Figures Will Show What the Christian College is Doing for

the Ministry of the Church.

SOURCES OF SUPPLY FOR THE STUDENTS NOW IN

EIGHT OF OUR SEMINARIES.

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Of the above 550 students,
466, or 84 per cent. are from Christian Institutions; 70 per cent. from

Christian Colleges; 8 per cent. from Christian
Universities and 6 per cent. from other Christian
Institutions.

33, or 6 per cent. are from State Institutions, Universities, Normal

Schools and High Schools.

51, or 10 per cent. are from unclassified or unknown Institutions.

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