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THE

CHURCHES

OT

ROME AND ENGLAND

COMPARED

IN THEIR DECLARED

DOCTRINES AND PRACTICES ;

WHEREIN IS SHOWN

THE DISAGREEMENT OF THE TWO CHURCHES ON MANY OF THE

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Doth a fountain send forth, at the same place, sweet water and bitter JAMES iii. 11.

Their rock is not as our rock, even our enemies themselves being judges.-Deut. xxxii. 31.

LONDON:
JOHN W. PARKER, WEST STRAND.

M.DCCC.XXXVI.

TO THE READER.

An assertion, attributed to Lord Viscount Melbourne, in the Report of his Lordship's Speech of August 20th, 1835, that "the Roman Catholicks, in all the fundamentals of Christianity, agree with Protestants," induced the Author of this Tract to address a "Letter to his Lordship," in disproof of the affirmation. He has reason to think that the Letter has attained its object in the minds of many readers. And in compliance with a suggestion from several quarters, that greater benefit might probably result from a publication of its substance in a different and more general form, the argument is put forth again in the following treatise, with some additional examples of disagreement.

LONDON, March 21st, 1836.

1 THE

CHURCHES OF ROME AND ENGLAND

COMPARED.

Ever since the period of the Reformation, when a separation took place between the Churches of England and of Rome, a wide disagreement has been universally acknowledged to exist between them. on many fundamental articles of Christianity. For no inconsiderable portion of that interval, probably for about the last century, the members of the Church of England, having been trained in a general belief of such a disagreement, have been but little diligent in informing themselves of the particulars of which it consists : and the ministers of that Church, however their course of professional study may have directed them to an acquaintance with the particulars, have for the most part not judged it necessary to impress them on the minds of their congregations. But such a disagreement, instead of being taken for granted as heretofore, appears now at length to be by some persons called in question, or even to be plainly denied; the differences between them are supposed to be of little moment; and an agreement between the two Churches in all the fundamental articles of Christianity

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