The Chautauquan, Volumes 57-58

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M. Bailey, 1909

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Page 209 - Ethiopia and Egypt were her strength, and it was infinite; Put and Lubim were thy helpers. Yet was she carried away, she went into captivity: her young children also were dashed in pieces at the top of all the streets : and they cast lots for her honourable men, and all her great men were bound in chains.
Page 439 - First in his east the glorious lamp was seen, Regent of day, and all the horizon round Invested with bright rays, jocund to run His longitude through heaven's high road; the grey Dawn, and the Pleiades, before him danced, Shedding sweet influence...
Page 47 - THE VIKING AGE. The' Early History, Manners, and Customs of the Ancestors of the English-Speaking Nations.
Page 425 - Praised be my Lord for our sister water, who is very serviceable unto us, and humble, and precious, and clean. Praised be my Lord for our brother fire, through whom Thou givest us light in the darkness; and he is bright, and pleasant, and very mighty and strong. Praised be my Lord for our mother the earth, the which doth sustain us and keep us, and bringeth forth divers fruits, and flowers of many colors, and grass.
Page 426 - Praised be my Lord for our mother the earth, the which doth sustain us and keep us, and bringeth forth divers fruits and flowers of many colors, and grass. Praised be my Lord for all those who pardon one another for his love's sake, and who endure weakness and tribulation ; blessed are they who peaceably shall endure, for thou, O most Highest, shalt give them a crown.
Page 425 - Praised be my Lord for our brother the wind, and for air and cloud, calms and all weather by the which thou upholdest life in all creatures. Praised be my Lord for our sister water, who is very serviceable unto us and humble and precious and clean.
Page 379 - Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert . . . Near them, on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed: And on the pedestal these words appear: 'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings: Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!
Page 425 - FROM the forests and highlands We come, we come ! From the river-girt islands, Where loud waves are dumb Listening to my sweet pipings...
Page 208 - Art thou better than populous No, that was situate among the rivers, that had the waters round about it, whose rampart was the sea, and her wall was from the sea?
Page 273 - When, in the carven chest, The winds that blew and waves in wild unrest, Smote her with fear, she, not with cheeks unwet, Her arms of love round Perseus set, And said : "O child, what grief is mine ! But...

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