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LONDON :
TRÜBNER & CO., 60, PATERNOSTER ROW.

1863.

CONTENTS OF VOLUME I.

PAGE

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337

2. Seemann on the Inhabitants of the Fiji Islands. By A. A. Fraser,

Esq., F.A.S.L.

355

3. The Relation of Man to the Inferior Forms of Animal Life. By

Charles S. Wake, Esq., F.A.S.L.

365

4. The Proceedings of the Anthropological Society of Paris

373

5. Anthropology at the British Association

379

Dr. Hunt on Anthropological Classification

382

Mr. Carter Blake on South American Cranioscopy

383

Dr. Hunt on the Negro

386

Mr. W. Turner on Cranial Deformities

391

Mr. Duckworth on the Human Cranium from Amiens

392

393
Þr. Embleton on the Anatomy of a Young Chimpanzee 394

Mr. Carter Blake on Syndactyly

401

Mr. Roberts and Professor Busk on a Cist

403

Mr. Crawfurd on the Commixture of Man

405

Dr. Camps on Troops in India

410

Dr. Murray on Instinctive Actions

412

Mr. Samuelson on Life in the Atmosphere

412

Mr. Glaisher on the Influence of High Altitudes on Man

414

Mr. Hall on the Social Life of the Celts

415

Mr. Petrie on the Antiquities of the Orkneys

425

Lord Lovaine on Lacustrian Human Habitations

426

Professor Beete Jukes on Certain Markings on the Horns of

Megaceros Hibernicus

433

Mr. Crawfurd on Sir C. Lyell's Antiquity of Man

433

Professor Phillips on the Antiquity of Man

436

Mr. Godwin-Austen on the Alluvial Accumulation in the Valley

of the Somme and Ouse

438

Mr. Wallace on Man in the Malay Archipelago

441

Mutu Coomara Swamy on the Ethnology of Ceylon

444

Mr. Crawfurd on the Origin of the Gypsies

415

Mr. Crawfurd on the Celtic Languages

447

Mr. Charnock on Celtic Languages

448

Personal Recriminations in Section D

456

Concluding Remarks

461

6. Waitz’s Introduction to Anthropology

465

7. Kingsley's Water Babies

472

8. Lunacy and Phrenology. By C. Carter Blake, Esq., F.G.S,. F.A.S.L. 476

9. The Rival Races; or the Sons of Joel

481

10. Ramsay on Geology and Anthropology

484

11. Baruch Spinoza

488

12. Anthropology in the Nursery

489

13. Miscellanea Anthropologica -

491

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THE

ANTHROPOLOGICAL REVIEW.

MAY, 1863.

INTRODUCTORY ADDRESS ON THE STUDY OF

ANTHROPOLOGY,

DELIVERED BEFORE THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON,

February 24th, 1863,
By JAMES HUNT, Ph. D., F.S.A., F.R.S.L.,
FOREIGN ASSOCIATE OF THE ANTHROPOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF PARIS,

PRESIDENT.

GENTLEMEN,—I find myself placed in the honourable but somewhat difficult position of being the first speaker at a newly-formed scientific society. One thing, however, inspires me with confidence, the knowledge that my position has been caused more by my interest in the objects of the Society than by any special qualification for such a task. I shall therefore offer neither excuse nor apology for the matter I bring before yon: but will simply beg all who hear me, to grant me that patience and sympathy to which, as your President, I feel myself to some extent entitled. We are met, then, this evening, to inaugurate a society of students of a great branch of science which, up to this time, has found no fit place for discussion in any other institution.

Without dwelling on the etymology* of the title of our Society, it is still requisite that we should have some clear conception of the real import and breadth of the science which we unite specially to study and elucidate.

By some writers (especially by Dr. Latham), Anthropology has been so circumscribed in its meaning as to imply nothing more than the

• "Anthropos, man, both as a generic term and of individuals, from Homer downwards ; in plural of whole nations, mankind, the whole world.

“ Anthropos, Lat. homo, being man, as opposed to beast.

“ Anthropologos, speaking or treating of man. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, 4, 3, 31."-LIDDELL & SCOTT.

VOL. I.-NO. I.

B

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