Proceedings: General Index to Volumes One to Fifty of the Proceedings of the American Pharmaceutical Association from 1852 to 1902, Inclusive

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Page 330 - ... and the name and place of business of the seller. Nor shall it be lawful for any person to sell or deliver any poisons enumerated in Schedules A...
Page 46 - ... not known or used by others in this country before his invention or discovery thereof, and not patented or described in any printed publication in this or any foreign country before his invention or discovery thereof...
Page 860 - ... a certificate in writing, in which shall be stated the name or title by which such society shall be known in law...
Page 72 - Southard, chairman of the Committee on Coinage, Weights, and Measures...
Page 46 - Any person who has invented or discovered any new and useful art, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter...
Page xxvii - To create and maintain a standard of professional honesty equal to the amount of our professional knowledge, with a view to the highest good and greatest protection to the public.
Page 159 - To that which warbles through the vernal •wood; The spider's touch, how exquisitely fine! Feels at each thread, and lives along the line: In the nice bee, what sense, so subtly true, From poisonous herbs extracts the healing dew * How Instinct varies in the grovelling swine, Compared, half-reasoning elephant, with thine!
Page 330 - A" without, before delivering the same to the purchaser, causing an entry to be made, in a book kept for that purpose, stating the date of...
Page 860 - When the certificate shall have been filed as aforesaid, the persons who shall have signed and acknowledged the same, and their successors, shall be a body politic and corporate...
Page xxiv - The knowledge of them, as in established use. is among the first elements of education, and is often learned by those who learn nothing else, not even to read and write. This knowledge is riveted in the memory by the habitual application of it to the employments of men throughout life.

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