The arts of logick and rhetorick [adapted by J. Oldmixon from La manière de bien penser] by father Bouhours. To which are added parallel quotations out of English authors

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 344 - Thus fell the greatest subject in power, and little inferior to any in fortune, that was at that time in any of the three kingdoms; who could well remember the time, when he led those people, who then pursued him to his grave. He was a man of great parts, and extraordinary endowments of nature ; not unadorned with some addition of art and learning, though that again was more improved and illustrated by the other...
Page 369 - Give me my Romeo: and when he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night And pay no worship to the garish sun.
Page 91 - ... of nature, all the works of art, all the labours of men, are reduced to nothing; all that we admired and adored before, as great...
Page 61 - In short, our souls are at present delightfully lost and bewildered in a pleasing delusion, and we walk about like the enchanted hero of a romance, who sees beautiful castles, woods and meadows; and at the same time hears the warbling of birds, and the purling of streams; but upon the finishing of some secret spell, the fantastic scene breaks up, and the disconsolate knight finds himself on a barren heath, or in a solitary desert.
Page 93 - Down thither prone in flight He speeds, and through the vast ethereal sky Sails between worlds and worlds, with steady wing: Now on the polar winds, then with quick fan Winnows the buxom air...
Page 296 - When it does not let him sleep, it is a flame that sends up no smoke ; when it is opposed by counsel and advice, it is a fire that rages the more by the wind's blowing upon it.
Page 281 - Such are thy Pictures, Kneller. Such thy Skill, That Nature seems obedient to thy Will: Comes out, and meets thy Pencil in the draught: Lives there, and wants but words to speak her thought.
Page 77 - Hither, as to their fountain , other stars Repairing, in their golden urns draw light...
Page 231 - ... in a way so very becoming, that the air of the pretty gentleman is preserved, under the lowliness of the preacher. I...
Page 91 - ... of this earth ; what is become of her now? She laid her foundations deep, and her palaces were strong and sumptuous: she glorified herself, and lived deliciously; and said in her heart, I sit a queen, and shall see no sorrow.

Bibliographic information