An Inquiry Concerning the Origin of Christianity

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, 2010 M08 19 - 488 pages
Charles Christian Hennell (1809-1850) was a theological writer best known for his association with and influence on George Eliot. First published in 1838, this volume contains Hennell's deconstruction of the Bible to separate the historical character of Jesus from later myths which became incorporated into Christianity. Hennell examines the Gospels and other parts of the New and Old Testaments which are concerned with Jesus, demonstrating that all miraculous events can be explained without reference to supernatural intervention and emphasising the importance of the historical context. Despite Hennell's unorthodox conclusions this volume is not intended as an attack on Christianity, which Hennell praises as the 'purest form of natural religion'. This volume is described as his most important theological work and is one of the Biblical criticisms which inspired George Eliot to question her faith in the 1840's. Hennell's 1839 work Christian Theism is also included in this volume.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

CHAPTER
1
CHAPTER II
35
CHAPTER III
63
CHAPTER IV
83
CHAPTER VI
104
CHAPTER VII
113
CHAPTER VIII
154
CHAPTER IX
185
CHAPTER X
194
CHAPTER XI
209
CHAPTER XIII
243
CHAPTER XIV
261
CHAPTER XV
291
CHAPTER XVII
334
CHAPTER XVIII
357
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information