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THE

PILGRIM'S PROGRESS

IN THE

NINETEENTH CENTURY.

BY WILLIAM R. WEEKS, D.D.

NEW YORK:
M. W. DODD, BRICK CHURCH CHAPEL.

BOSTON: CROCKER & BREWSTER, 47 WASHINGTON ST.

NORTH WRENTHAM, MASS. : CHARLES SIMMONS.

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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1848, by

MRS. HANNAH WEEKS,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of New Jersey.

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1849

ADVERTISEMENT.

THE PILGRIM's PROGRESS IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY contends for the distinguishing truths and order of the Gospel. It exalts God, by ascribing to him his real perfections and prerogatives. It searches the heart, keeps prominent the vital distinction between the saint and sinner, and draws the line between the one only disinterested, and the many forms of selfish religion. No one can read these pages without feeling that it is a great thing to be a Christian.

It is a body of discriminating instruction on doctrinal truth and experimental religion, on revivals, and the way to promote them,-in easy, colloquial discourse; and is fitted for distinguished usefulness in any age. In the present it seems to be peculiarly needed, and we trust will meet with a cordial reception.

Several of the first chapters have been published three times; and the inquiry has often been made, when the completion of the work might be expected. The Editor of the first Theological Magazine in our country once said of these first chapters: “So much discriminating evangelical truth, in so pleasing a style, was perhaps never before published in our world." The Author's lamented death just as the work was going to press, has now sealed it as his last testimony in the cause of truth.

The lapse of nearly a quarter of a century since the introduction of the new measures in promoting revivals, now seems to call for their exposure. Though a portion of the generation who witnessed these trying scenes are gone, there are some still living whose hearts are scarcely healed from the wounds they then received; and a generation is coming upon the stage, which needs to be guarded against these and similar devices of the adversary. To detect false principles, and trace moral causes to their final effects, is of great importance to the cause of truth. What the mounds and dikes of Holland have been to the sea of waters, such have been the publications of Edwards and others, to the floods of error that are ever liable to overflow and desolate the Church of God. This book presents another barrier. The cause of vital piety will be promoted by its circula

and the future ecclesiastical historian will catch a prominent feature of our times from the record.

THE PUBLISHERS.

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PREFACE.

AMONG the books which fell into the hands of the Author when a child, was Bunyan's Pilgrim; and no one interested his feelings more deeply, or probably contributed in a higher degree to give form to his mind and direction to his thoughts. And when, at a later period, by the study of divine truth, he was led to perceive some mistakes into which Bunyan had fallen, in a theology generally sound, he was led to think it desirable that a Pilgrim's Progress should be written in which those mistakes should be avoided, and which should be adapted to the present times. Accordingly, about the year 1812, a few of the first chapters of this work were sketched, and some thoughts set down for its further progress. About 1824-5, twenty-one chapters of it were published in a periodical; and in 1828-9 six more, making the first twenty-seven chapters, which are now given with very little alteration. About that time materials were collected for the further progress of the work, as will be recognized by those who were conversant with that remarkable season. It was not, however, till recently, that circumstances permitted the work to be taken up again, and carried through. The Author makes no pretensions to the originality of Bunyan;

but he hopes, by taking his Pilgrims along the same path which Bunyan has marked out, and introducing such new incidents as are adapted to the present century, to furnish a book of useful reading for both young and old. In discussing opinions and practices which he deems erroneous, his aim has been to do impartial justice. He has, therefore, when practicable, taken the very words of authors from their own publications, and accompanied them with the usual marks of quotation. This he has done also with the works of authors he approves. But, as he desired to direct the attention of his readers to things, and not to persons, he has not usually given names. The characters introduced are chiefly allegorical, though some will doubtless be considered as taken from the life. And if any one shall recognize his own likeness, the Author sincerely hopes that he will not be like one who " beholdeth his natural face in a glass, and goeth his way, and straightway forgetteth what manner of man he was ;'' but will carefully correct any faults he shall discover; so that the view which is given may be for his profit, and not for his hurt.

THE AUTHOR.

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