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FROM THE

MEMORANDA

OF

MARY HAGG ER,

ASHFORD,

KENT.

“The memory of the just is blessed."-PROV. X. 7.
“Gather up the fragments that remain that nothing be lost."-JOHN v. 12.

LONDON:

HARVEY AND DARTON,

55, GRACECHURCH STREET.

1841.

HARVARD UNIVERSITY

LIBRARY

LONDON : JOHNSTON AND BARRETT,

MARK LANE.

THE INTRODUCTION.

WHEN the Christian example of those we love is withdrawn, and we are no longer cheered by their conversation, nor instructed by their admonitions, we recur with satisfaction to those instances of faithfulness which memory furnishes; but when assisted by written records of their devout and exercised minds, they become enhanced in value, and we esteem them as precious memorials of departed worth.

Such we believe will be the feelings of many who have known and loved the subject of this short Memoir, the reader will find for his instruction and encouragement, that in the simplicity and sincerity of her heart, she has unfolded some of her mental exercises; and as they breathe throughout the language of piety and resignation under deep and complicated trials, they will, it is hoped, afford consolation to those in similar circumstances, seeing it was by the grace of God she was what she was, and to the sustaining power of His grace, she bore testimony during a long protracted life.

In the relation of a mother few exceeded her in tenderness, and she endeavoured to attain to Christian resignation when bereaved of her children, six of whom died at different periods.

Instructed in the school of adversity, and possessing a sympathetic mind, she was peculiarly qualified to impart consolation to the weary traveller Zionward, and to extend the hand of encouragement to those who had wandered from the true Shepherd---endeavouring to comfort them which were in any trouble, by the comfort wherewith she herself was comforted of God.

Deeply impressed with gratitude for the blessings with which the evening of her day was crowned, and a mind reconciled to the dispensations of Providence in earlier life, she often dwelt upon the subject in feeling remembrance of the mercies she had experienced, and to almost the latest period, her conversation and manners partook of the cheerfulness and pleasantness of her meridian life. When the awful time arrived in which she was permitted to enter her eternal rest, she passed away in sweet serenity, full of days and full of peace, and we humbly believe her redeemed spirit is numbered with those who came out of great tribulations, and have washed their robes, and made them white in the blood of the Lamb.

Ashford, 8th month, 1841.

A TESTIMONY

From FOLKSTONE MONTHLY MEETING, concerning

MARY HAGGER, deceased.

In preserving a memorial of this our dear friend, we are instructively reminded of her meek and lowly example; she was desirous to be found adorning the doctrine of God her Saviour in all things; that her rejoicing might be this, the testimony of her conscience, that with simplicity and godly sincerity, not with fleshly wisdom, but by the grace of God, she had her conversation in the world.

She was the daughter of our friends, William and Lettice Knight, and was born at Stone-hall, near Wanstead, Essex, the 4th of 1st mo., 1758.

The following selections from her memoranda, serve to show the early pious care of her parents. “I was blessed with tender parents, that watched over themselves and their family with a religious care, taking us to meetings; they were very diligent attenders themselves, though residing at a distance of several miles, the weather or business seldom if ever preventing.” She thus adverts to her religious feelings in early life: “I well remember being in a garden by myself, and knew not what it was that so sweetened and tendered by heart, that for a considerable time, I felt as though I could not leave the spot, and several times afterwards I took opportunities to retire, and had similar feelings.” As I grew I often felt the prevalence of my natural disposition, giving way too much to indifference in things relating to my best

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