Beulah: A Novel

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Carleton, 1879 - 510 pages

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Page 36 - In the world's broad field of battle, In the bivouac of Life, Be not like dumb, driven cattle! Be a hero in the strife!
Page 204 - The moving Moon went up the sky, And nowhere did abide; Softly she was going up, And a star or two beside...
Page 252 - Man doth not yield him to the angels, nor unto death utterly, save only through the weakness of his feeble will.
Page 253 - The day is done, and the darkness Falls from the wings of Night, As a feather is wafted downward From an Eagle in his flight. I see the lights of the village Gleam through the rain and the mist, And a feeling of sadness comes o'er me That my soul cannot resist; A feeling of sadness and longing, That is not akin to pain, And resembles sorrow only As the mist resembles the rain. Come, read to me some poem, Some simple...
Page 281 - But lest I should mislead any when I have my own head, and obey my whims, let me remind the reader that I am only an experimenter. Do not set the least value on what I do, or the least discredit on what I do not, as if I pretended to settle anything as true or false. I unsettle all things. No facts are to me sacred; none are profane; I simply experiment, an endless seeker, with no Past at my back.
Page 476 - Life is real ! Life is earnest ! And the grave is not its goal ; "Dust thou art, to dust returnest,
Page 280 - A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines. With consistency a great soul has simply nothing to do. He may as well concern himself with his shadow on the wall. Speak what you think now in hard words, and tomorrow speak what tomorrow thinks in hard words again, though it contradict everything you said today. "Ah, so you shall be sure to be misunderstood.
Page 441 - There are two sorts of ignorance: we philosophize to escape ignorance , and the consummation of our philosophy is ignorance ; we start from the one, we repose in the other; they are the goals from which, and to which, we tend; and the pursuit of knowledge is but a course between two ignorances as human life is itself only a travelling from grave to grave. The highest reach of human science is the scientific recognition of human ignorance ; ' Qui nescit ignorare , ignorat scire.
Page 130 - At home I dream that at Naples, at Rome, I can be intoxicated with beauty and lose my sadness. I pack my trunk, embrace my friends, embark on the sea and at last wake up in Naples, and there beside me is the stern fact, the sad self, unrelenting, identical, that I fled from.

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