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II.

Robene answered, by the rood. Nothing of love I know. But keep my sheep under yon wood.-c Lo where they range in a row. What has marred thee in thy mood. Makyne, show thou to me. Or what is love or to be loved.-Fain would I learn that law (of love). III. h At the lore of love if thou wilt learn. Take there an A, B, C.- Be kind, courteous, and fair of aspect or feature.-k Wise, hardy, and free See that no danger daunt thee. Whatever sorrow in secret thou sufferest. Exert thyself with pains to thy utmost power. Be patient and privy.

IV.

He. Robene answerit her agane P,
I wait not quhat is luve,
But I haif marvell, in certaine ',
Quhat makis thè this wanrufe".
The weddir is fair, and I am fane',
My scheip gois haill aboif",
An we wald play us in this plane▾
They wald us baith reproif".

V.

She. Robene take tent unto my tale *, And wirk all as I reid,

And thow sall haif my hart all haile2 Eik and my maidenheid.

Sen God sendis bute for baill",

And for murning remeid,

I dern with the, but gif I daill, Doubtless I am bot deid d.

VI.

He. Makyne, to morne this ilka tyde,
And ye will meit me heir ';
Peradventure my scheip may gangbesyde",
Quhill we haif liggit full neirh,

Bot maugre haif I, an I byde,
Fra they begin to steir,

Quhat lyis on hairt I will nocht hyd,
Makyne then mak gud cheir.

IV. P Robene answered her again. I wot not what is love. But I (have) wonder, certainly.-s What makes thee thus melancholy. The weather is fair, and I am glad." My sheep go healthful above (or in the uplands). - If we should play in this plain. They would reprove

us both.

V. x Robene, take heed unto my tale.-y And do all as I advise.—2 And thou shalt have my heart entirely. a Since God sends good for evil-b And for mourning if I

separate.-d Doubtless I shall die (broken-hearted).

VI. Makyne, to-morrow this very time.-f If ye will meet me here. Perhaps my sheep may go aside.

h Until we have lain near.

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THE little that is known of Dunbar has been gleaned from the complaints in his own poetry, and from the abuse of his contemporary Kennedy, which is chiefly directed against his poverty. From the colophon of one of his poems, dated at Oxford, it has been suggested, as a conjecture, that he studied at that university. By his own account, he travelled through France and England as a novice of the Franciscan order; and, in that capacity, confesses that he was guilty of sins, probably professional frauds, from the stain

1.

WILLIAM DUNBAR.

THE DAUNCE OF THE SEVEN DEADLY SINS THROUGH HELL.

II. *

[Born, 1460? Died, 1520?]

OF Februar the fiftene nychta,

Full lang befoir the dayis licht",

I lay intille a trance;

And then I saw baith Hevin and Hell;
Methocht amang the fiendis fell,

Mahoun gart cry ane Dance',
Of shrewis that were never shreving,
Against the feast of Fasternis evinh,

To mak their observance :
He bad gallands ga graith a gyis,
And cast up gamountis in the skies",
As varlotis dois in France.

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of which the holy water could not cleanse him. On his return to Scotland he commemorated the nuptials of James IV. with Margaret Tudor, in his poem of the Thistle and Rose; but we find that James turned a deaf ear to his remonstrances for a benefice, and that the queen exerted her influence in his behalf ineffectually. Yet, from the verses on his dancing in the queen's chamber, it appears that he was received at court on familiar terms.

[† Dunbar in 1477 was entered among the Determinantes, or Bachelors of Arts, at Salvator's College, St. Andrew's, and in 1479 he took his degree there of Master of Arts. (See Laing's Dunbar, vol. i. p. 9.) That he studied at Oxford at any time is highly improbable.]

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XI.

Than cryd Mahoun for a Heleand Padyane, Syn ran a Feynd to fetch Mac Fadyane,

Far northwart in a nuke,

Be he the Correnoch had done schouts,
Ersche-men so gadderit him about'

In hell grit rume they tuke:

XI. P Then cried Satan for a highland pageant.The name of some highland laird. I suppose,' says Lord Hailes, this name was chosen by the poet as one of the harshest that occurred to him.'- Far northward in a nook. By the time that he had raised the Correnoch or cry of help.-t Highlanders so gathered about him.

DAVID LYNDSAY, according to the conjecture of his latest editor*, was born in 1490. He was educated at St. Andrew's, and leaving that university, probably about the age of nineteen, became the page and companion of James V. during the prince's childhood, not his tutor, as has been sometimes inaccurately stated. When the young king burst from the faction which had oppressed himself and his people, Lyndsay published his Dream, a poem on the miseries which Scotland had suffered during the minority. In 1530, the king appointed him Lyon King at Arms, and a grant of knighthood, as usual, accompanied the office. In that capacity he went several times abroad, and was one of those who were sent to demand a princess of the Imperial line for the Scottish sovereign. James having, however, changed his mind to a connexion with France, and having at length fixed his choice on the Princess Magdalene, Lyndsay was sent to attend upon her to Scotland; but her death happening six weeks after her arrival, occasioned another poem from our author, entitled the "Deploracion." On the arrival of Mary of Guise, to supply her place, he superintended the ceremony of her triumphant entry into Edinburgh; and, blending the fancy of a poet with the godliness of a reformer, he so constructed the pageant, that a lady like an angel, who came out of an artificial cloud, exhorted her majesty to serve God, obey her husband, and keep her body pure, according to God's commandments.

Thae termegantis, with tag and tatter, Full lowd in Ersche begowd to clatter,

And rowp like revin and ruke". The devil sa devit was with thair yell", That in the depest pot of hell

He smurit thame with smuke".

SIR DAVID LYNDSAY.

[Born, 1490? Died, 1557.]

On the 14th of December, 1542, Lyndsay witnessed the decease of James V., at his palace of Falkland, after a connexion between them which had subsisted since the earliest days of the prince. If the death of James (as some of his biographers

*Mr. G. Chalmers.

u And croaked like ravens and rooks.-- The devil was so deafened with their yell.-w He smothered thein with smoke.

have asserted) occasioned our poet's banishment from court, it is certain that his retirement was not of long continuance; since he was sent, in 1543, by the Regent of Scotland, as Lyon King, to the Emperor of Germany. Before this period the principles of the Reformed religion had begun to take a general root in the minds of his countrymen; and Lyndsay, who had already written a drama in the style of the old moralities, with a view to ridicule the corruptions of the popish clergy, returned from the Continent to devote his pen and his personal influence to the cause of the new faith. In the parliaments which met at Edinburgh and Linlithgow, in 1544-45 and 46, he represented the county of Cupar in Fife; and in 1547, he is recorded among the champions of the Reformation, who counselled the ordination of John Knox.

The death of Cardinal Beaton drew from him a poem on the subject, entitled, a Tragedy, (the term tragedy was not then confined to the drama,) in which he has been charged with drawing together all the worst things that could be said of the murdered prelate. It is incumbent, however, on those who blame him for so doing, to prove that those worst things were not atrocious. Beaton's principal failing was a disposition to burn with fire those who opposed his ambition, or who differed from his creed; and if Lyndsay was malignant in exposing one tyrant, what a libeller must Tacitus be accounted!

His last embassy was to Denmark, in order to negotiate for a free trade with Scotland, and to solicit ships to protect the Scottish coasts against the English. It was not till after returning from this business that he published Squyre Meldrum, the last, and the liveliest of his works.

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