The Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War in the United States of America, Volume 1

Front Cover
T. Belknap, 1874
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Contents

ANDERSONS QUARTERS IN FORT SUMTER
81
THE CITADEL MILITARY ACADEMY AT CHARLESTON
82
SANDBAG BATTERY AT FORT MOULTRIE
83
OLD CUSTOM HOUSE IN CHARLESTON
84
INITIAL LETTER
85
PORTRAIT OF JOHN B FLOYD
86
PORTRAIT OF JOSEPH HOLT
87
RESIDENCE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COMMIS
88
PORTRAIT OF JAMES L
89
SIGNATURES OF THE COMMISSIONERS
90
NORTH FRONT OF THE WHITE HOUSE
91
THE STAR OF THE WEST
92
MAP OF CHARLESTON HARBOR IN JAN 1861 157 159 FORT DAVIS
93
PORTRAIT OF FRANCIS W PICKENS
94
TAILPIECERUINS IN CHARLESTON
95
INITIAL LETTER
96
PORTRAIT OF DAVID L YULEE
97
PORTRAIT OF ADAM J SLEMMER
98
FORTS PICKENS AND MCREE
99
NAVYYARD AT PENSACOLA
100
A CASEMATE IN FORT PICKENS
101
FORT PULASKI
102
CUSTOM HOUSE AT NEW ORLEANS
103
SIGNATURES OF MOUTON AND WHEAT
104
FACSIMILE OF A PART OF SLIDELLS LETTER
105
THE PELICAN FLAG
106
PORTRAIT OF JOHN A DIX
108
Secession Convention 100 Reassembling in Charleston 101 Proceedings of the Convention 102 Re
109
PORTRAIT OF SAMUEL HOUSTON
110
TAILPIECEEGG OF SECESSION
111
INITIAL LETTER
112
PORTRAIT OF JOHN LETCHER 114 PORTRAIT OF R M T HUNTER
114
Addresses and Declaration 109110 The Nationality of South Carolina proclaimed 111 Rejoicings
115
PORTRAIT OF ISHAM G HARRIS
116
PORTRAIT OF BERIAH MAGOFFIN
117
PORTRAIT OF CLAIBORNE F JACKSON
118
PORTRAIT OF ISRAEL Washburne
119
PORTRAIT OF JOHN A ANDREW
120
PORTRAIT OF WILLIAM SPRAGUE
121
PORTRAIT OF EDWIN D MORGAN
122
VIEW IN INDEPENDENCE SQUARE
123
PORTRAIT OF ANDREW G CURTIN
124
PORTRAIT OF WILLIAM DENNISON
125
PORTRAIT OF AUSTIN BLAIR
126
PORTRAIT OF RICHARD YATES
127
PORTRAIT OF ALEXANDER W RANDALL
128
PORTRAIT OF SAMUEL J KIRKWOOD
129
PORTRAIT OF ALEXANDER RAMSAY
130
TAILPIECETREASON Pursued 132 INITIAL LETTER
132
PORTRAIT OF WILLIAM H SEWARD 184 PORTRAIT OF ANDREW JOHNSON 185 PORTRAIT OF CLEMENT C CLAY 186 PORTRAIT OF JO...
133
NORTHERN FLAG
134
STATE HOUSE at MONTGOMERY
136
WASHINGTON ARTILLERY
137
PORTRAIT OF JEFFERSON DAVIS 139 149 THE CONSPIRATORS FLAG
139
CHAPTER VI
140
PORTRAIT OF JOHN H REAGAN
145
TAILPIECEOUTLAW
147
INITIAL LETTER
153
CHAPTER VII
161
MinuteMenSeizure of Forts in North Carolina 161 Secession Movements in Mississippi 162 Secession
170
CHAPTER VIII
192
LOUISIANA Zouave
201
CHAPTER IX
216
Line between Loyalists and Disloyalists distinctly drawnConspirators in Congress 216 The Conspiracy
228
CHAPTER X
235
247
247
Assembling of the Peace Convention at Washington City 235 Sincerity of the Virginia Politicians suspected
256
CHAPTER XI
262
FORT WACHITA 270 166 163 FORT LANCASTER
270
FORT BROWN
271
MR LINCOLNS RESIDENCE AT SPRINGFIELD
275
THE TAYLOR BUILDING BALTIMORE
278
PORTRAIT OF GEORGE P KANE
281
PORTRAIT OF ISAAC W HAYNE
284
SNYDERS MONUMENT
313
PORTRAIT OF P G T BEAUREGARD 202 185 FACSIMILE OF A PART OF BEAUREGARDS 203 LETTER TO ANDERSON
318
PORTRAIT OF LE ROY POPE WALKER 818
319
ROUND SHOT FROM FORT SUMTER
322
EFFECT OF CANNONSHOT ON FORT SUMTER
323
BLAKELY GUN 824
324
INTERNAL APPEARANCE OF FORT SUMTER 212 AFTER THE BOMBARDMENT
325
RUINS OF FORT SUMTER IN 1864
331
GOLD BOX PRESENTED TO ANDERSON
332
ANDERSONS SWORD
333
OBVERSE OF THE FIRST AND SECOND CLASS 215 SUMTER MEDALS 216 195 FORT SUMTER MEDALTHIRD AND Fourth 225 CLASS
334
CHAPTER XIV
335
INITIAL LETTER 229 197 PORTRAIT OF SIMON CAMERON
337
STREET VIEW IN MONTGOMERY IN 1861
340
WOODCUT FROM A MEMPHIS NEWSPAPER
350
CHAPTER XV
361
FLAGSTAFF BASTION FORT PICKENS
367
The Florida Forts 361 Affairs at Key West 862 The Secessionists watchedForts Jefferson and Taylor
368
THE PICKENS MEDAL
370
PORTRAIT OF S R MALLORY
379
CHAPTER XVI
382
NORTH CAROLINA FLAG
386
PORTRAIT OF HENEY PAULDING
396
PORTRAIT OF BENJAMIN F BUTLER
402
CHAPTER XVII
409
THE PRATT STREET BRIDGE
412
His Inducements to be loyal 422 Arlington House and its SurroundingsDesigns against Wash
421
PORTRAIT OF JOHN ELLIS WOOL
424
CHAPTER XVIII
433
ANNAPOLIS JUNCTION IN 1861
439
WASHINGTON
448
CHAPTER XIX
454
Ohio prepares for War 454 Indiana makes ready for the Conflict 455 Illinois vigilant and active 456 Last
468
882
473
CHAPTER XX
478
Uprising of the Southern People 478 Character of the early Volunteers 479 The Insurgents on Arlington
487
411
490
CHAPTER XXI
498
General Butler at Fortress Monroe 498 Movements of Troops near Fortress Monroe 500 Slaves pronounced
518
Insurgents at Harpers Ferry 519 Union Troops advancing on Harpers Ferry 520 Evacuation of Harpers
526
CHAPTER XXIII
538
Treasonable Work in Missouri 538Birds Point fortifiedGenerals Pillow Polk and Pope 559 General
556
Congress and its Duties 561 Organization of the HouseThe Presidents Message 562 Reports of
588
CHAPTER XXV
5
INITIAL LETTER
13
PORTRAIT OF DAVID E TWIGGS
150
THE ALAMO
151
158 PORTRAIT OF BEN MCCULLOCH ConfederatE POSTAGE STAMP
153
234
162
235
235
236
236
237
237
241
241
800
340
440
440
809
575
Composition of the opposing Armies 584585 Movements of the National Troops on Fairfax Court House
586
831
8
PORTRAIT OF GEORGE ASHMUN
17
PORTRAIT OF HENRY A WISE
23
PALMETTO FLAG
29
INITIAL LETTER
35
43
72
គូ គឺ រឺ គឺ គឺ គឺ ន
97
334
334
PAGE
444
490
490
496
496
502
502
508
508
834
538
335
629
844
639

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Page 248 - ... it is of infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national Union, to your collective and individual happiness; that you should cherish a cordial, habitual and immovable attachment to it; accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity...
Page 292 - The power confided to me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the government, and to collect the duties and imposts ; but beyond what may be necessary for these objects, there will be no invasion, no using of force against or among the people anywhere.
Page 260 - Its foundations are laid, its corner-stone rests, upon the great truth. that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery, subordination to the superior race, is his natural and normal condition. This, our new government, is the first, in the history of the world, based upon this great physical, philosophical, and moral truth.
Page 32 - ... it becomes our duty, by legislation, whenever such legislation is necessary, to maintain this provision of the Constitution against all attempts to violate it; and we deny the authority of Congress, of a territorial legislature, or of any individuals, to give legal existence to slavery in any territory of the United States.
Page 293 - Plainly the central idea of secession is the essence of anarchy. A majority held in restraint by constitutional checks and limitations, and always changing easily with deliberate changes of popular opinions and sentiments, is the only true sovereign of a free people. Whoever rejects it does of necessity fly to anarchy or to despotism.
Page 292 - I deem it better to forego, for the time, the uses of such offices. The mails, unless repelled, will continue to be furnished in all parts of the Union. So far as possible, the people everywhere shall have that sense of perfect security which is most favorable to calm thought and reflection. The course here indicated will be followed, unless current events and experience...
Page 291 - I hold that, in contemplation of universal law and of the Constitution, the Union of these States is perpetual. Perpetuity is implied if not expressed, in the fundamental law of all national governments. It is safe to assert that no government proper ever had a provision in its organic law for its own termination.
Page 248 - Union to your collective and individual happiness ; that you should cherish a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it; accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity ; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can, in any event, be abandoned ; and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the...
Page 292 - Think, if you can, of a single instance in which a plainly written provision of the Constitution has ever been denied. If, by the mere force of numbers, a majority should deprive a minority of any clearly written constitutional right, it might, in a moral point of view, justify revolution certainly would, if such right were a vital one.
Page 290 - Apprehension seems to exist among the people of the Southern States that by the accession of a Republican Administration their property and their peace and personal security are to be endangered. There has never been any reasonable cause for such apprehension.

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