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quick.”

moment of time, for thought is probably as great an addition to our

pains as to our pleasures. It reveals “ That faculty, which is usually to us a number of the distresses of called penetratiori, seems to depend our fellow-creatures, which escape altogether onsuch an intimate know. common eyes; and, I fear, it sel. ledge of human nature, as enables dom discovers evil till it is too lato us accurately to diftinguith the af- to remedy it. fociations which influence the train “ The remarks contained in this of thought. It is, in fact, the art Essay will in some measure account of filling up the blanks in convería- for inany delicate embarrassments, tion, and turning over readily a which a nice observer experiences number of ideas which intervene, in company. He pierces beyond though not expressed, and which the outward colouring. He fees are the several links of the chain in vices, and consequences, which none another person's mind. It is, as it but himself remarks. His heart were, transforming yourself into bleeds, when every thing around that other person, and thinking for him wears the face of joy. I have some time exactly the same. Ex. observed such a person, at an enterperience will render a man most a- tainment, more pensive than those droit at this, as at all other exercises. for whom he felt. A lively genius is necessary in the " These faculties of penetration observer ; some aid may possibly be and foresight will, perhaps, fomederived from phyfiognomy; the ge- times lead us into error; and, if aeral character of the subject will fancy be but active, we may magaffist in decyphering his thoughts; nify a small discovery into fome. and the external manners and beha- thing very extraordinary. But viour must be carefully noted. whether they contribute or not to

" Similar to this, and connected the happiness of the poffeffor, the with it, is the faculty of foreseeing, good etfects of them to fociety are from the present thoughts and ac- not to be disputed, if in good hands : pions of men, what they will pro- and the higher endowments of the bably be in future. All our judge mind I hope, and I believe, usually ments of the future are formed by are. In good hands, these facul. the recollection of the past: on our ties may prevent, if not all, a knowledge of human nature, there- great deal of mischief, by timely fore, this power must depend. advice ; and the evil they can do,

5 These faculties constitute the in bad hands, is not equal to the true second fight, which, as was good which they in other respects imagined of the fabulous, brings produce."

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MONG the ancient sects of sented suicide, when it appeared ne

philosophers, those who cessary to preserye their persons professed the leverer morality repre. from disgrace, or to avoid the risk

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6. As this commemoration is not pulsations in every limb, and ramionly the first instance of a band of fications of veins and arteries in an such magnitude being assembled animal, could not be more reciprotogether, but of any band, at all cal, isochronous, and under the numerous, performing in a similar regulation of the heart, than the situation, without the allistance of members of this body of muficians a manu-ductor, to regulate the under that of the conductor and meafure, the perforinances in West. leader. The totality of found seemminster abbey may be safely pro-ed to proceed from one voice, and nounced, no less remarkable for the one instrument; and its powers multiplicity of voices and instru- produced, not only new and exquiments employed, than for accu- fite fenfations in judges and lovers racy and precision. When all the of the art, but were felt by those wheels of that huge machine, the who never received pleasure froin orchestra, were in motion, the ef- mufic before. fect resembled clock-work in every “ These effects, which will be thing, but want of feeling and ex- long remembered by the present preilion.

public, perhaps to the diladvan“ And as the power of gravity tage of all other choral performand attraction in bodies is propor- ances, run the risk of being doubttioned to their mass and dentity, so ed by all but those who heard it seems as if the magnitude of this them, and the present description band had commanded and impelled of being pronounced fabulous, if adhesion and obedience, beyond that it Mould survive the prefent geneof any other of inferior force. The ration.”

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Of PENETRATION and FORESIGHT.

[From Mr. GREGORY's Effays, Historical and Moral.]

TODERN philosophy, if it lustrated by a story which Hobbes

did not invent, has at least relates in the third chapter of his methodized, elucidated, and explain- Leviathan. " In a discourse, faye ed a system, which accounts better he, on our present civil war, what for the operations of the mind than could seem more impertinent than the ingenious but discordant meta- to ask, as one did, what was the vaphysics of Plato and Aristotle. lue of a Roman penny? Yet to me

6. It is, I believe, generally a- the coherence was manifeft enough. greed, that our ideas are all con. For the thought of the war intronected, linked, or, in the technical duced the thought of delivering up phrase, affociated together; and the king to hisenemies; the thought that each idea has its proximate, of that brought the thought of the which it never fails to introduce : delivering up of Christ, and that and thus our thoughts fucceed one again the thought of the thirty another in a regular feries, as they pence, which was the price of that'; happen to be related to each other. and thence easily followed that ma. * This theory is pleafantly il. licious question : and all this in a

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quick.”

moment of time, for thought is probably as great an addition to our

pains as to our pleasures. It reveals “ That faculty, which is usually to us a number of the distresses of called penetratiori, seems to depend our fellow-creatures, which escape altogether on such an intimate know• common eyes; and, I fear, it selledge of human nature, as enables dom discovers evil till it is too late us accurately to diftinguith the af- to remedy it. sociations which influence the train “ The remarks contained in this of thought. It is, in fact, the art Effay will in some measure account of filling up the blanks in conversa- for many delicate embarrassinents, tion, and turning over readily a which a nice observer experiences number of ideas which intervene, in company. He pierces beyond though not expressed, and which the outward colouring. He fees are the several links of the chain in vices, and consequences, which none another person's mind. It is, as it but himself remarks. His heart were, transforming yourself into bleeds, when every thing around that other person, and thinking for him wears the face of joy. I have some time exactly the same. Ex. observed such a person, at an enterperience will render a man most a- tainment, more pensive than those droit at this, as at all other exercises. for whom he felt. A lively genius is necessary in the « These faculties of penetration obferver; some aid may pollibly be and foresight will, perhaps, somederived from phyfiognomy; the ge- times lead us into error; and, if neral character of the subject will fancy be but active, we may magaflist in decyphering his thoughts; nify a small discovery into fome. and the external manners and beha- thing very extraordinary. But viour must be carefully noted. whether they contribute or not to

- Similar to this, and connected the happiness of the poffeffor, the with it, is the faculty of foreseeing, good etfects of them to fociety are from the present thoughts and ac- not to be disputed, if in good hands : gions of men, what they will pro- and the higher endowments of the bably be in future. All our judg- mind I hope, and I believe, usually ments of the future are formed by are. In good hands, these facul. the recollection of the past: on our ties may prevent, if not all, a knowledge of human nature, there- great deal of mischief, by timely fore, this power must depend. advice ; and the evil they can do,

« These faculties constitute the in bad hands, is not equal to the true second fight, which, as was good which they in other respects imagined of the fabulous, brings produce,"

An IMPARTIAL INQUIRY into the REASONABLENESS of

SUICIDE.

[From the same Work.]

MONG the ancient fects of sented suicide, when it appeared ne

philosophers, those who cessary to preserye their persons professed the leverer morality repre. from disgrace, or to avoid the rikk

of

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of forfeiting their honour, as ap act ferve, that however a momentary of religion ; but it was feldom prac. resolution may fortify the mind, tised by the gay votaries of Epicu. however other motives may be presus, who citeemed life as being dominant on fome particular occafruitful of happiness under almoit fions, death is in reality the evil any circumstances.

which is most generally dreaded, « Our modern Epicureans, who and is the prime cause why other have assiduously selected whatever evils are accounted such. Who piwas the worst in all the ancient sy- ties the disease that is not mortal? fteins, have in this respect deviated Tell a company, that their friend from the example of their founder; or neighbour is confined to his and fince to commit suicide has chamber by the goue in the extre. been held contrary to religion, it is mities ; that he is not only disabled become fashionable with these con. from helping himself, but suffers tittent reasoners to contend for its the mott excruciating torture in his expediency. There is, however, fingers or his toes; the narrative little danger that their tenets on will hardly chace a lingle smile from this subject will ever rise into gene. the countenances of the auditors, ral estimation. A few may amuse or give birth to one serious reflecthemselves indeed with fantaliical tion. Tell this company, at anspeculations ; but whatever coun- other time, that the same person is teracts the instincts of nature will in the crisis of a fever, that he is never be commonly practised. deprived of sense, and that the scene

“ Whether the love of life be an of life is expected immediately to habitual passion, resulting from the close, and you may presently obgreater proportion of good than of serve the difference between the fenevil in this state of existence ; ortiment or apprehention of pain and whether it be an innate principle death. An apoplexy is an awful implanted in us at our first crea- and alarming event; many local tion ; either way, self-preservation complaints will occation treble the appears to be the ordinance of Pro- pain, and yet these neither excite vidence. The advocates for natu- our pity nor our apprehensions. ral religion agree, that we can only " Moit of the human paffions, know the Creator's will by thote even avarice and ambition, have general arrangements, which are been traced with equal truth and called the laws of nature. Now ingenuity into the love of lifc. The by what means should we be proper former is derived from the excessive judges, when it is lawful or expe- care of providing for our subliftdient to difpenfe with them? ence : the object of tbe latter is the

“ But waving these higher spe. admiration of others ; and this adculations, as well as those argu- miration is coveted only because we ments founded on religious princi- can make it fubfervient to the obples, which have so successfully taining of the means and the combeen urged against suicide-if I can forts of life. This is certainly the produce moral, and, ftill more, felf- origin of ambition ; though in the ith arguments againit its expediency present state of fociety men are amin any case, the disquisition will be bitious from custom and example. more adapted to the notions and ca- « Poverty is dreaded, because it pacities of my antagonists.

leads to death : it cannot be the “ In the firit place I would ob- mere pain of starving of which men 1785

0

are

foner, as well as from the depofi- otherwise than by the tenderest ties tion of witnesses, that Don Juan had of mutual affection and a promise lived from his infancy in the family of marriage, which, however, he of a rich merchant at Lisbon, who acknowledged had not been focarried on a considerable trade and lemnized : that he was the son of a correspondence in the Brazils. Don gentleman of confiderable fortune Juan being allowed to take this in the Brazils, who left him an inmerchant's name, it was generally fant to the care of the merchant in supposed that he was his natural question : that the merchant, for son; and a clandeiline affair of love reasons best known to himself, chore having been carried on between to call him by his own name, and him and the merchant's daughter, this being done in his infancy, he Josepha, who was an only child, was taught to believe that he was The becanie pregnant, and a medie an orphan youth, the son of a di, cinc being adminillered to her by ftant relation of the person who the hands of Don Juan, she died in adopted him. He begged his judges a few hours after, with all the therefore to observe, that he never symptoms of a person who had understood Josepha to be his fifter; taken poison. The mother of the that as to her being with child by young lady survived her death but him, he acknowledged it, and praya few days; and the father threw ed God forgiveness for an offence, himself into a convent of Mendio which it had been his intention to cants, making over by deed of gift repair by marrying her; that with the whole of his property to the respect to the medicine, he certaine supposed murderer.

ly did give it to her with his own * In this account there seemed a hands, for that she was fick in conArange obscurity of facts; for some sequence of her pregnancy, and made strongly to the crimination being afraid of creating alarm or of Don Juan, and the last mention- suspicion in her parents, had reed circumstance was of fo contra- quired him to order certain drugs dictory a nature, as to throw the from an apothecary, as if for him. whole into perplexity; and there- felf, which he accordingly did; fore to compel the prisoner to a and he verily believed they were farther elucidation of the case, it faithfully mixed, inasmuch' as he was thought proper to interrogate stood by the man whilst he preparhim by torture.

ed the medicine, and saw every in" Whilit this was preparing, grcdient separately put in. Don Juan, without betraying the “ The judges thereupon asked leaft alarm upon what was going him, if he would take it on his forward, told bis judges that it conscience to say, that the lady did would save them and himself fome not die by poifon. Don Juan, trouble, if they would receive his bursting into tears for the first time, confeffion upon certain points, to answered, to his eternal forrow he which he should truly speak, but knew that the did die by poison.beyond which all the tortures in Was that poison contained in the the world could not force one fyl. medicine the took? It was. Did lable. He said that he was not the he impute the crime of mixing the fon, as was fuppofed, of the mer- poison in the medicine to the apochant, with whom he lived, nor thecary, or did he cake it on him. allied to the deceased Josepha any felf? Neither the apothecary nor

himself

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