Page images
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]

ner. He said, “I fhould not have to. That the ancients held to, is forgiven Mr. Boswell, had he not plain from this ; that Euripides, in brought you here, Dr. Johnson." his Hecuba, makes him the person He produced a very long stalk of to interpofe.”—Monboddo. * The com, as a specimen of his crop, history of manners is the most va. and said " you seç here the lætas luable. I never set a high value on Jegetes, " and observed that Virgil any other history."-Johnson.“Nor Teemed to be as an enthusiastic a l; and therefore I eiteem biogra. farmer as he, and was certainly a phy, as giving us what comes near practical one - Fobnjon. “ It does to ourselves, what we can turn to not always follow, my lord, that a use."-Bofive!!

. “But in the course man who has written a good poem of general hiftory, we find manon an art, has practised it. Philip ners. In wars, we see the dispoliMiller told me, that in Philips's tions of people, their degrees of huCyder, a poem, all the precepts manity, and other particulars."were just, and indeed better than in Johnson. “ Yes; but then you must books written for the purpose of in- take all the facts to get this ; and it ítructing; yet Philips had never is but a little you get."-Monhoido. made cyder."

" And it is that little which makes " I started the subject of emigra, history valuable.” Bravo! thought tions.Fobnfor. " To a man of l; they agree like two brothers, mere animal life, you can urge no Monboddo. I am sorry, Dr. Johnargument against going to America, fon, you was not longer at Edin. but that it will be some time before burgh, to receive the homage of our he will get the earth to produce. men of Icarning."- Johnson. “My But a man of any intellectual en- lord, I received great respect and joyment will not easily go and im great kindness."-Bofwell, merse himself and his poiterity for goes back to Edinburgh after our ages in barbarifm."

tour.

We talked of the decrease " He and my lord spoke highly of learning in Scotland, and of the of Homer,-Fobufon." He had “ Muse's Welcome." - Jobufon, all the learning of his age. The “ Learning is much decreased in fhield of Achilles shews a nation in England, in my remembrance."war, & nation in peace ; harvest Morboddo, “ You, Sir, have lived sport, nay stealing."--Monboddo. to see its decrease in England, I its * Aye, and what we (looking to extinction in Scotland." However, me) would call a parliament-house I brought him to confess that the fccrre ; a cause pleaded•'-Johnson. high school of Edinburgh did well, " That is part of the life of a na: Johnfon. “ Learning has decreated țion in peace. And there are in in England, becaufe learning will Homer such characters of heroes, not do so much for a man as for. and combinations of qualities of he. merly. There are other ways of roes, that the united powers of man; getting preferment. Few bishops kind ever since have not produced are now made for their learning, any but what are to be found there." To be a bishop, a inan must be

Monboddo, " Yet no character learned in a learned age-sfactious is described."-Fobnfon. " No; in a factious age; but always of they all develope themselves. Aga: eminence. Warburton is an excep: memnon is always a gentleman-like tion; though his learning alone did character; he has always Bag Axor Bot raise him. He was firit an ano

çagonist

[ocr errors]

He

tagonist to Pope, and helped Theo- have done greater feats with my bild to publín his Shakspeare; but, knife than this ;” though he had feeing Pope the rising man—when taken a very hearty dinner. My Crousaz attacked his Eijay on Man, lord, who affects or believes he fol. for some faults which it has, and lows an abstemious syiiem, seemed fome which it has not, Warburton struck with Dr. Johnfon's manner defended it in the Review of that of living. I had a particular fatistime. This brought him acquaint- faction in being under the roof of ed with Pope, and he gained his Monboddo, my lord being my fafriendfhip. Pope introduced hiin ther's old friend, and having been to Allen-Allen married him to his always very good to me. We were niece: so, by Allen's interest and cordial together. He aked Dr. his own, he was made it bifhop. Johnson and me to stay all night. But then his learning was the fine When I said we muft be at Aberquà non: he knew how to make the deen, he replied, “ Weil, I am most of it; but I do not find by any like the Romans : I fall Tay to you, dishonest means."- Monboddo. He • Happy to come happy to de. is a great man.”—Johnson. “Yes; part!" He thanked Dr. Johnson he has great knowledge-great for his rifit.-Johnson. " I little powers of mind. Hardly any man thought, when I had the honour to brings greater variety of learning meet your lordship in London, that to bear upon his point.”-Monbod. I should fee you at Monboddo."do. 6. He is one of the greatest After dinner, as the ladies were go. lights of your church.”- Johnfon. ing away, Dr. Johnson would itand “ Why? we are not so sure of his up. He infifted that politeness was being very friendly to us. He of great consequence in society. blazes, if you will; but this is not “ It is (faid he) fictitious benevo. always the steadiest light. Lowth lence. It supplies the place of it is another bifhop who has risen by amongst those who fee each other his learning.”

only in public, or but little. De“ Dr. Johnson examined young pend upon it, the want of it never Arthur, lord Monboddo's fón, in fails to produce something disagreeLatin. He answered very well; able to one or other. I have al. upon which he faid, with compla- ways applied to good breeding, what cency, “ Get you gone! When Addison in his Cato fays of Ho. king James comes back, you shall nour : be in the Muses Welcome!” My

“ Honour's a sacred tic; the law of lord and Dr. Johnson disputed a lit

kings; ile, whether the favage or the Lon: The noble mind's distinguishing perfec. don fhopkeeper had the best exift- tion, ence; his lordmhip, as usual, pre; That aids and trengthens Virtue where lę ferring the savage. My lord was And imita:es her actions where she is not." as hospitable as I could have wifh. ed, and I saw both Dr. Johnson and * When he took up his large oak him liking each other better every stick, he said, " My lord, 'that's hour.

Homerick :" thus pleasantly allud “ Dr. Johnson having retired for ing to his lorüfip's favourite wria short time, my lord spoke of histor. Gory, my lord's black fer. conversación as I could have wishe vant, was sent as our guide fo far, ed, Dr. Johnson had said, “ I This was another point of timila:

not find twenty lines together with. « Live, while you live, the epicure out some extravagance. He repeat

would say, ed two paffages from his Love of And seize the pleasures of the present day.

Live, while you live, the sacred preacher Fame, the characters of Brunetta

cries, and Stella, which he praised high. And give to God each moment as it flies. ly. He said Young pressed him Lurd, in my views let both united be ; inuch to come to Wellwyn. He I live in pleasure, when I live to thee." always intended it, but never went. 6. I asked, if it was not strange He was forry when Young died. that government should permit so The caufcof quarrel between Young many infidel writings to pass with. and his son, he told us, was, that out censure.- Johnjon. * Sir, it is his fon infifted Young should turn mighty foolith. It is for want of away a clergyman's widow, who knowing their own power. The lived with him, and who, having present family on the throne came acquired great influence over the to the crown againít the will of father, was saucy to the fon. Dr. nine-tenths of the people. WheJohnfon faid, Me could not conceal ther these nine-tenths were right or her resentment at him, for faying to wrong, it is not our business now Young, that " an oid man nould to enquire. But such being the finot refign himself to the manage. tuation of the royal family, they ment of any body.” I asked him, were glad to encourage all who if there was any improper connec- would be their friends. Now you tion between them. "No, sir, no know every bad man is a Whig; more than between two ftatues.- every man who has loose notions. He was past fourscore, and she a . The church was all again it this fa. very coarse woman. She read to mily. They were, as I say, glad hiin, and, I suppose, made his cof- tu encourage any friends; and fee, and frothed his chocolate, and therefore, tince their accetlion, there did such things as an old inan wishes is no instance of any man being to have done for him."

kept back on account of his bad ! Dr. Doddridge being men- principles; and hence this inundationed, he observed that " he was tion of impiety." I observed that author of one of the finest epigrams Mr. Hume, some of whose writings ịu the English language. 'li is in were very unfavourable to religion, Orton's Life of him. The subject was, however, a Tory.-Jobufon. is his family-notto-Dum vivimus, “ Sir, Hume is a Tory by chance, vivamus ; which, in its primary as being a Scotchman; but not up: fignification, is, to be sure, not very on a principle of duty; for he has suitable to a Christian divine ; but no principle. If he is any thing, he paraphrased it thus :

.he is a Hobbitt.”

Dr. JOHNSON'S VISIT to the DUKE of ARGYLE.

From the famae Wovk, )

"M

rend Mr. John M'Aulay, Calder, came to us this morning, one of the ministers of Inveraray, and accompanied us to the caftle,

where

where I presented Dr. Johnson to he), your own relation, Mr. Arthe duke of Argyle. We were chibald Campbell, can tell you betthewn through the house ; and I ter about it tan I can. He was a never fall forget the impreffion bishop of the nonjuring commumade upon my fancy by some of the nion, and wrote a book upon the ladies' maids tripping about in neat subject.” He engaged to get it for morning dresses. After seeing for her grace. He afterwards gave a a long time little but rufticity, their fuli history of Mr. Archibald Camplively manner, and gay inviting ap- bell, which I am forry I do not repearance, pleased me so much, that collect particularly. He said, Mr. I thought, for the moment, I could Campbell had been bred a violent have been a knight-crrant for them. Whig, but afterwards “ kept bet

“ We then got into a low one- ter company, and became a Tory.' horse chair, ordered for us by the He said this with a smile, in pleaduke, in which we drove about the fant allusion, as I thought, to the place. Dr. Johnson was much opposition between his own political Itruck by the grandeur and elegance principles, and those of the duke's of this princely seat. He said, clan. He added, that Mr. Camp" What I admire here, is the total bell, after the Revolution, was defiance of expence.” I had a par- thrown into jail on account of his ticular pride in thewing him a great tenets; but, on application by letnumber of time old trees, to com- ter to the old lord Townshend, was pensate for the nakedness which had released : that he always spoke of made such an impreision on him on his lordship with great gratitude, the easlern coast of Scotland. He saying, “though a Whig, he had thought the castle too low, and humanity.” wished it had been a story higher. “ The subject of luxury was in.

“ When we came in, before din- troduced. Dr. Johnson defended ner, we found the duke and some it. 5. We have now (said he), a gentlemen in the hall. Dr. John- splendid dinner before us; which fon took inuch notice of the large of all these dishes is unwholesome?" collection of arms, which are ex. The duke aflerted, that he had obcellently disposed there. I told what served the grandees of Spain dimi. he had laid tu fir Alexander MÓDo- nished in their fize by luxury. Dr. nald, of his ancestors not suffering Johnson politely refrained from optheir arms to ruit. " Well (faid poting directly an observation which the doctor), but let us be glad we the duke himself had made ; but live in times when arms may ruf.” said, “ Man inust be very different We can fit to-day at his grace's ta from other animals, if he is dimi. ble, without any risk of being at. nished by good living; for the fize tacked, and perhaps fitting down of all other animals is increased by again wounded or inaimed.” The it. I made some remark that seemduke placed Dr. Johnson next him- ed to imply a belief in second fight. self at table.

The duchess said, “I fancy you “ The duchess was very atten- will be a Methodist.” This was the tive to Dr. Johnson. I know not only sentence her grace deigned to how a middle ftate came to be men- utter to me; and I take it for grante sioned. Her grace wilhed to hear ed, the thought it a good hit on him on that point. “Madam (faid my credulity in the Douglas cause,

[ocr errors][ocr errors]

" A gen.

not find twenty lines together with. " Live, while you live, the epicure out some extravagance. He repeat

would fuy, ed two paffages from his Love of And seize the pleasures of the present day.

Live, while you live, the sacred preacher Fame, the characters of Brunetta

cries, and Stella, which he praised high. And give to God each moment as it fies ly. He said Young pressed him Lurd, in my views let both united be ; inuch to come to Wellwyn. He I live in pleasure, when I live to thee." always intended it, but never went. " I asked, if it was not strange He was forry when Young died. that government should permit fo The caufcof quarrel between Young many infidel writings to pass with. and his son, he told us, was, that out censure.-Johnjon. « Sir, it is his fan infifted Young should turn mighty foolith. It is for want of away a clergy man's widow, who knowing their own power. The lived with him, and who, having present family on the throne came acquired great influence over thc to the crown against the will of father, was saucy to the son. Dr. nine-tenths of the people. WheJohnson said, he could not conceal ther these nine-tenths were right or her resentment at him, for saying to wrong, it is not our business now Young, that " an old man nould to enquire. But such being the ti. not relign himself to the manage. tuation of the royal family, they ment of any body.” I asked him, were glad to encourage all who if there was any improper connec- would be their friends. Now you tion between them. “ No, sir, no know every bad man is a Whig; more than between two statues.- every man who has loose notions. He was past fourscore, and she a . The church was all again it this favery coarse woman, She read to mily. They were, as I say, glad him, and, I suppose, made his cof. tu encourage any friends; and fee, and frothed his chocolate, and therefore, since their accetlion, there did such things as an old man wishes is no instance of any man being to have done for him."

- kept back on account of his bad ! Dr. Doddridge being men- principles ; and hence this inundationed, he observed that he was tion of impiety." I observed that author of one of the finest epigrams Mr. Hume, some of whose writings ịu the English language. It is in were very unfavourable to religion, Orton's Life of him. The subject was, however, a Tory.-fobafore is his family-notto-Dum vivimus, .“ Sir, Hume is a Tory by chance, wivamus; which, in its primary as being a Scotchman; but not upfignification, is, to be sure, not very on a principle of duty; for he has suitable to a Christian divine ; but no principle. If he is any thing, he paraphrased it thus ;

.he is a Hobbist.”

Dr. JOHNSON'S VISIT to the DUKE of ARGYLE.

[ From the fanne Work, ] Y acquaintance, the reve, and brother to our good friend at

rend Mr. John M'Aulay, Calder, came to us this morning, one of the ministers of loveraray, and accompanied us to the cattle,

where

"M

« PreviousContinue »