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authorised such an idea in the usual down to dinner, but poor Amelia politeness of a well-bred man of could hardly swallow a morsel ; thirty seven; the pitied the misfor. her mind was in a tumultuous agitune, me admired the elegant and tation of pleasure and amazement. engaging, though serious manners, The malicious impostor, enjoying and the revered the virtues, of Mr. her confufion, allowed her no time Nelson; but, fuppofing his mind to to compose her hurried spirits in be entirely engrotled, as it really was, the folitude of her chamber. Some by his fingular charitable pursuits, female visitors arrived to tea; and, the entertained not a thought of en. at length, Mr. Nelson entered the gaging his affection. Mrs. Worm: room. Amelia trembled and bluthwood was determined to play off ed as he approached her; but the her favourite engine of malignity, was a little relieved from her ema counterfeited letter. She had ac. barrassment by the business of the quired, in her youth, the very tca-cable, over which the presided. dangerous talent of forging any Amelia was naturally graceful in hand that she pleased; and her pai- every thing she did, but the present fion for mischief had afforded her agitation of her mind gave a temmuch practice in this treacherous porary aukwardness to all her moart. Having previously, and fe- tions: the committed many little cretly, engaged Mr. Nelion to drink blunders in the management of the tea with her, she wrote a billet to tea-table; a cup fell from her Amelia, in the name of that gen- trembling hand, and was broken; tleman, and with the most perfect but the politeness of Mr. Nelson imitation of his hand. The billet led him to say so many kind and faid, that he defigned himself the graceful things to her on these petty pleasure of passing that afternoon incidents, that, instead of increasat the house of Mrs. Wormwood, ing her distress, they produced an and requested the favour of a pri- oppolite effect, and the tumult of vate corference with Mils Nevil in her borom gradually subsided into the course of the evening, inti. a calm and composed delight. She inating, in the most delicate and ventured to meet the eyes of Mr. doubtful terms, an ardent defire of Nelson, and thought them expresbecoming her husband. Mrs.Worm- five of that tenderness which prowood contrived that Amelia Mould mised a happy end to all her mise not receive this billet till just before fortunes. At the idea of exchange dinner time, that flie might not ing misery and dependence for comshew it to her friend aud confidant, fort and 'honour, as the wife of so Mrs. Melford, and, by her means, amiable a man, her heart expanded detect its fallacy before the hour of with the most innocent and grateher intended humiliation arrived. ful joy. This appeared in her

66 Amelia blushed in reading the countenance, and gave such an ex. note, and, in the first surprise of quisite radiance to all her features, unsuspecting innocence, gave it to that the looked a thousand times the vigilant Mrs. Wormwood, who more beautiful than ever. Mrs. burst into vehement expressions of Wormwood faw this improvement delight, congratulated her blushing of her charms, and, fickening 2 guest on the full success of her the fight, determined to reduce the charms, and triumphed in her own fplendor of such insufferable beauprophetic disceranent. They lat ty, and hastily terminate the tri

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forded a favourite occupation and Amelia pleaded her sense of past amusement to Mrs. Melford, Nele obligations, and withed to take a fon, after taking a few turns in this peaceful leave of her patroness ; diminutive garden, finding himself but she submitted to the urgent en rather chilled by the air of the treaties of Nelson, and remained evening, retreated again into the for a few weeks under the roof of little room he had paised, intending Mrs. Melford, when she was unit, to wait there till Amelia departed; ed at the altar to the man of her but the partition between the par- heart. Nelson had the double de, lours being extremely flight, he light of rewarding the affection of overheard the tender confeffion of an angel, and of punishing the Amelia, and was hurried towards malevolence of a fiend: he an. her by an irresistible impulse, in nounced in person to Mrs. Worm. the manner already described. wood his intended marriage with

66 Mrs. Melford was the first who Amelia, on the very night when recovered from the kind of trance, that treacherous old maid had amus. into which our little party had ed herself with the hope of derid. been thrown by their general sur. ing her guest; whose return the prise ; and the enabled the tender was eagerly expecting, in the mopair, in the prospect of whose uni- ment Nelson arrived to say, that on her warm heart exulted, to re. Amelia would return no more. gain that easy and joyous possession “ The surprise and mortification of their faculties, which they lost of Mrs. Wormwood arose almost to for some little time in their mutual frenzy: the racked her malicious embarrassment. The applause of and inventive brain for expedients her friend, and the adoration of her to defeat the match, and circulated lover, foon taught the diffident a report for that purpose, which Amelia to think less severely of decency will not allow me to ex herself. The warm-heated Mrs, plain. Her artifice was detected Melford declared, that these occure and despised. Amelia was not only rences were the work of heaven, married, but the most admired, the “ That, replied the affectionate most beloved, and the happiest of Nelson, I am most willing to al. human beings ; an event which low; but you must grant, that preyed fo incessantly on the spirit heaven has produced our present of Mrs. Wormwood, that she fell happiness by the blind agency of a into a rapid decline, and ended, in fiend; and, as our dear Amelia has a few months, her mischievous and too gentle a spirit to rejoice in be. unhappy life, a memorable ex holding the malignity of a devil ample, that the most artful ma. converted into the torment of its lignity may sometimes procure for poffeffor, I must beg that the may the object of its envy that very not return, even for a fingle night, happiness which it labours to préto the house of Mrs. Wormwood.” vent!"

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HISTORY OF MELETINA.

(From the same Work.)

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plished daughter of opu. very seemed to be rather designed lent parents.

Her mother died as å trial of her fortitude than as a when the was very young ; her fa: reward of her tenderness : his bo. ther, a man of a feeling and liberal dily health was restored to him, mind, devoted himself entirely tp but his mental faculties were des the education of his two lovely stroyed. The unhappy Meletina, children, Melctina and her brother, in the place of a lively young who, being nearly of an age, and friend, and a generous protector, qual in all the best gifts of nature, found only a poor babbling idiot, grew up together in the tenderelt whose fituation appeared to her the affection. It happened that Mele. more deplorable, because, though tina, now turned of twenty, was he had utterly lost a fulid and a on a distant visit, at the house of a brilliant understanding, he seemed female relation, when the heard to retain all his benevolent aff-cthat her father, whom the loved tions. By one peculiarity which most tenderly, was attacked by a attended him, she was singularly very dangerous disorder. The poor affected; and perhaps it made her girl hastened home in the most painresolve on the extraordin ri sacri ful anxiety, which was converted fice which she has offered to his cainto the bitteres distress, by her lamity. The peculiarity I speak finding, on her return, that her of was this: he not only discoverfather was dead, and her brother ed great satisfaction in the fight of confined by the malignant diftem- his lifter, though utterly unable to per, which he had caught in his maintain a rational conversation incessant attendance on the parent with her; but if she left him for they had loft. The utmost efforts any considerable time, he began were used to keep Meletina from to express, by many wild gestures, the chamber of her brother, but extreme agitation and anxiety, and no entieaties could prevail on her could never be prevailed on to to defest the only surviving object touch any food, except in the preof her ardent affection, and, defence of Mele ina. Many experi{pising the idea of her own dan- ments were tried to quiet his appreger, me attended the unhappy hensions on this point, and to reyouth, who was now del rious, lieve his filler from fo inconvenient with such tender affiduity, that flie and so painful an attendance. These would not permit him to receive experiments did not succeed ; bue either nourishment or meliuine tuo medical friends of Meletina, from any hand but her own. The who took a generous interest in her purity of her confiitution, or the health and happiness, engaged to immediate care of Providence, pre- correct this peculiarity in her poor served the generous Meletina from senseless brother, and convinced infection, and heaven granted to her, that for his fake, as well as her earnest prayers the endangered her own, Mie ought to acquiesce in

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forded a favourite occupation and Amelia pleaded her sense of past amusement to Mrs. Melford. Nele obligations, and wished to take a fon, after taking a few turns in this peaceful leave of her patroness ; diminutive garden, finding himself but she submitted to the urgent en rather chilled by the air of the treaties of Nelson, and remained evening, retreated again into the for a few weeks under the roof of little room he had pailed, intending Mrs. Melford, when she was unita to wait there till Amelia departed; ed at the altar to the man of her but the partition between the par- heart. Nelson had the double de, lours being extremely flight, he light of rewarding the affe&tion of overheard the tender confeflion of an angel, and of punishing the Amelia, and was hurried towards malevolence of a fiend: he an. her by an irresistible impulfe, in nounced in person to Mrs. Worm. the manner already described. wood his intended marriage with

“ Mrs. Melford was the first who Amelia, on the very night when recovered from the kind of trance, that treacherous old maid had amuse into which our little party had ed herself with the hope of derid. been thrown by their general sur. ing her guest; whose recurn the prise ; and the enabled the tender was eagerly expecting, in the mopair, in the prospect of whose uni- ment Nelson arrived to say, that on her warm heart exulted, to re. Amelia would return no more. gain that easy and joyous poffeffion “ The surprise and mortification of their faculties, which they lost of Mrs. Wormwood arose almost to for some little time in their mutual frenzy: she racked her malicious embarrassment. The applause of and inventive brain for expedients her friend, and the adoration of her to defeat the match, and circulated lover, foon taught the diffident a report for that purpose, which Amelia to think less severely of decency will not allow me to ex, herself. The warm-heated Mrs. plain. Her ariifice was detected Melford declared, that these occur. and despised. Amelia was not only rences were the work of heaven. married, but the most admired, the “ That, replied the affectionate most beloved, and the happiest of Nelson, I am most willing to al. human beings ; an event which low; but you must grant, that preyed fo incessantly on the spirit heaven has produced our present of Mrs. Wormwood, that the fell happiness by the blind agency of a into a rapid decline, and ended, in fiend ; and, as our dear Amelia has a few months, her mischievous and too gentle a spirit to rejoice in be- unhappy life, a memorable ex holding the malignity of a devil ample, that the most artful ma. converted into the torment of its lignity may sometimes procure for poffeffor, I must beg that she may the object of its envy that very not return, even for a single night, happiness which it labours to préto the house of Mrs. Wormwood.” vent!"

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ther, she would complete the scene conftant apparel. Nor is there any of general happiness, which that ottentation in this peculiarity of her joyful event would occasion, by dress; for her attendance on her the immediate acceptance of that brother is still so uniform, that she hand, which she now rejected only never appears in public, and indeed from the just scruples of genuine is never absent from her own house affection. Having thus settled their more than two or three hours at a very delicate conteit, they parted. time. From habit, and the affecThe soldier rejoined his regiment; tionate cast of her temper, she cakes but, in spite of military diffipation, a pleasure in the petty childish continued for a long time to write plays by which her hapless compavery tender letters to the generous nion is amufed ; and, so far from Meletina. At last, however, whe- finking heifelf into a itate of indother his passion was diminished by lence or apathylhe posseffes great its despair of being gratified, or delicacy of manners, and all the whether the purity of a chalte at- itrength and lustre of a refined un. tachment is incompatible with a derstanding. She is now turned martial life, while he was engaged of fifty; and, though her countein dangerous and distant service, he nance, when she is filent, has an was deeply involved in a very per. air of mild and touching melan. plexing illicit intrigue, which would choly, her conversation is animated probably have given him many and chearful. As her brother years of disquietude, had not the pleases himself by the habit of rifchance of war put an early period ing and going to rest with the lark, to his life: a musket-ball passed the has the long winter evenings through his body ; but he lived entirely to herself; and at this fcalong enough to write an affectionate son the has a great share of social parting letter to Meletina, in which enjoyinent, by receiving the visits he confessed his frailties, extolled of her selected friends. To these her angelic purity of heart, and en- she is remarkably open and unretreated her to do, what he folemnly served, and has a peculiar pleature assured her he did himself, consider in talking over the extraordinary both the time and the manner of occurrences of her early life. This his death, not as a misfortune, but circle indeed is small, though it is a blessing. Meletina lamented him juítly esteemed an honour to share when dead, as fhe had loved him the friendthip of Meletina, and living, with the most faithful ten- those who postess it have the hapderness; the mourned for him as piness of knowing perhaps the most for a husband; and, though many fingular and most interesting of anyears have elapsed since his de- cient virgins." cease, a grey filk is to this day her

A SET OF RESOLUTIONS FOR OLD AGE.

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XCEPT the reasons for a talk and intricate debates on facred

change be invincible, to live topics. To endeavour to get the and to die in the public profeffion of better of the intrusions of indolence the religion in which one was born of mind and body, those certain and bred. To avoid all prophane harbingers of enfeebling age. Ra

ther

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