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was A3 DISTRICT OF MASSACHUSETTS.To nit:

District Clerk's Office. BE IT REMEMBERED, that on the twenty second day of April, A. D. 1815, and in the thirty-ninth year of the independence of the United States of America, JOSEPH EMERBon, of the said District, has deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as Proprietor; in the words following, to zit:

“Writings of Miss Fanny Woodbury, who died at Beverly, Nov. 15, 1814, aged 25 years. Selected and edited by Joseph Emerson, Pastor of the Third Congregational Church in Beverly. “That life is long, which answers life's great end."

Young. “Blessed are the dead, whieh die in the Lord."

Avoice from heaven. In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, intitled, “An act for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the Copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such Copies, during the times therein mentioned;” and also to an act intitled, "An act supplementary to an act, intitled an act for the En. couragement

of Learning, by securing the Copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such Copies during the times therein mentioned; and extending the benefits thereof to the Arts of Designing, Engraving, and Elching, Historical and other Prints.

WILLIAM S. SHAW, Clerk of the District of Massachusetts.

The avails of this edition, after defraying the Expenses, will be given to the EDUCATION SOCIETY, which has been recently formed in Boston, for the purpose of assisting pious and indigent youths in procuring an education with a view to the Gospel Ministry:

BUHR/GRHO

storlos

PAGE.

INTRODUCTION,

5$

Advertisement,

8

Letter to Miss E. A. of Beverly,

9

Journal from Sept. 6, to Nov. 14, 1807,

10-17

Journal from Jan. 16, to Dec. 1, 1808,

1721

Letter to Miss N. B. of Beverly,

21

Journal from March 18, to Oct. 29, 1809,

22-29

Journal from Feb. 8, to May 27, 1810,

29-36

Lettér to Miss H. W. of Winchendon,

37

Journal from June 30, to Dec. 29, 1810,

38-43

Journal from April 11, to June 24, 1811,

43,44

Letter to Miss Harriet Atwood, of Haverhill,

45

Letter to Miss S. K. of Wenham,

51

Journal from Aug. to Sept. 12, 1811,

54,55

-Letter to Miss S. W. of Winchendon,

56

Letter to Miss H. H. of Beverly,

60

Journal from March 20, to April 28, 1812, 64,65

Letter to Miss A. C. H. of Bradford,

66

Journal from June 14, to June 27, 1812,

71-78

Extract from a Letter to Miss N. K. of Newburyport, 75

Letter to Miss N. J. of Beverly,

75

Journal from July 19, to July 23, 1812,

79,80

Letter to Miss N. J. of Beverly,

80

Journal from Aug. 7, to Aug. 9, 1812,

84-86

Letter to her Sisters,

87

Letter to Miss E. S. of Beverly,

88

Journal, Oct. 1812,

92

Letter to Mrs. H. P. of Bradford,

93

Letter to Miss C. G. of Bradford,

96

Journal, Dec. 1812,

. 100

Journal, Jan. 1, 1813,

102

Letter to Mrs. H. P. of Bradford,

103

Letter to Miss M. G. of Boston,

106

Letter to Miss N. J. of Beverly,

108

Note to Miss E. S of Beverly,

Letter to Misses B. K. and R. K. of Bradford,

11.3

Extract of a Letter to Miss N. J. of Beverly,

116

Letter to Misses B. K and R. K. of Bradford,

Journal from April 4, to April 8, 1812,

120-12%

Letter to Miss N. K. of Newburyport,

125

Letter to Miss B. K. of Bradford,

128

Letter to Mrs. M. A. of Haverhill,

131

Letter to Miss C. G. of Bradford,

Letter to Mr. A. P. and Mrs. F. P: of Bradford, 1.39

Letter to Miss C. G. of Bradford,

143

Letter to Miss S. K. of Wenham,

CONTENTS.

Extract from a Letter to Miss B. P. of Danvers, 150

Note to Miss E. S. of Beverly,

152

Letter to Miss B. P. of Danvers,

153

Letter to Miss S. P. B. of Lynnfield,

156

Letter to Miss N. J. of Beverly,

160

Journal, July, 1813,

164

Letter to Mrs. Atwood of Haverhill, and her daughters, 169

Letter to Miss M. S. of Chelmsford,

174

Extract of a Letter to Miss S. P. B. of Lynnfield, 178

Letter to Mr. D. S. of Beverly,

179

Letter to Miss B. P. of Danvers,

185

Letter to Miss M. S. of Chelmsford,

187

Journal, Nov. 5, 1813,

190

Letter to Miss N. J. of Beverly,

191

Letter to Miss C. G. of Bradford,

Note to Miss E. S. of Beverly,

196

Journal from Dec. 31, 1813, to Jan. 1, 1814, 197-200

Letter to Miss H. B. of Francistown,

200

Letter to Miss N. W. of Boston,

202

Letter to Miss B. P. of Danvers,

204,

Letter to Mrs. M. C. of Marblehead,

207

Note to Mrs. H. P. of Bradford, then at Beverly, 210

Note to Mrs. H. P. of Bradford, then at Beverly,

211

Journal, April 2, 1814,

212

Letter to Miss C. T. of Beverly,

216

Extract of a Letter to Mrs. H. P. of Bradford, 220

Note to Miss E. S. of Beverly,

221

Journal from April 23, to May, 1814,

222-228

Extracts of a Letter to Miss C. T. of Beverly,

230

Journal from May 12, to May 13, 1814,

233,234

Letter to Miss M. W. of Beverly,

234

Note to Miss E. S. of Beverly, then at Wenham,

236

Note to Miss E. S. of Beverly, then at Wenham, 237

Letter to Miss M. W. of Beverly,

238

Letter to Miss H. G. of Bradford,

Journal, June 19, 1814,

243

Note to Miss E. S. of Beverly,

Letter to Mrs. H. P. of Bradford,

247

Extract from a Letter to Miss N. K. of Newburypt, 250

Letter to Miss S. D. of Wenham,

252

Letter to Miss E.C. of Wenham,

258

Letter to Mrs. A. N. of Wenham,

263

Letter to Mrs. S. E. D. of Beverly,

266

Letter to Mrs. L. B. of Salem,

269

Journal, Oct. 2, 1814,

272

Valedictory Address,

273

Address to Christians,

279

INTRODUCTION.

Miss FANNY WOODBURY, daughter of Mr. Isaac and Mrs. Anna Woodbury, was born at Hamilton, Mass. Sept. 19, 1791. lu her infancy she was dedicated to God in baptism.

Possessed of a slender constitution, she rarely knew what it was to enjoy good health: and was often brought apparently to the very gates of death. * When about three years old, her sense of hearing was greatly impaired by a fever; and her deafness, which was sometimes much greater, than usual, was one of her greatest trials through life.

It is probable that her afflictions were one mean of lead. ing her to realize the importance of religion. The particular occasion of bringing her to deep and solemn consideration, was an account of a revival o, religion among the members of Bradford Academy, which she received in a letter from her sister. The next summer, 1807, while a member of that seminary, there is reason to hope that she was brought to feel that she was a sinner that her heart," to use her own words, “was exceedingly sinful, and opposed to God, and her will so stubborn, that it would not subinit to Him." "After this," she writes, “my feelings were chang. ed; I saw God to be holy; just and good, and, as such, I loved Him."

She soon after made a profession of religion and was enabled, during the rest of her life, in a very high degree, to adorn the doctrine of God her Savior. It is confidently believed, that those, who had the best opportunity of judga ing of her character, regarded and loved her, not ooly as a real Christian, but as eminently pious.

Highly estimating the importance of improving the femalo mind, she took fast hold of instruction.

With all her zetting, she was determined, if possible, to get oude standing. For this object she made very great exertions. With elose attention, and manifest advantage, she read much. Her reading was almost wholly of a religious kind. The Bible she regarded as the book of books, incomparably superior to all others. Next to the Bible she valued Scott's Com.

She joined the Second Church in Beverly, of which tl Rev. Moses Dow was Pastor..

mentary; as it afforded her so much assistance in discover, ing and improving the deep wisdom of God, revealed in the lively oracles. The whole of this great and admirable work she read twice in course once in the short period of six months. She not only improved her mind by reading, but by writing. In the latter part of her life, however, she regretted having made so great efforts to attain an elevated style. She was exceedingly delighted, when she could gain instruction by hearing, either in public or private,

Tho she bad a high relish for social intercourse, espe. cially for social worship, yet her dearest, sweetest, noblest comforts, she found in solitude. There, in her beloved chamber, wbich she seemed to regard as a little sanctua. ry--there, secluded from every mortal eye and mortal care, she could most freely and fully enjoy her pen, her Bible, and her God. Three times a day, like Daniel, did she retire, to hold sweet intercourse with Him, in whom her soul delighted; and sometimes she continued the employment for hours. When her friends desired an interest in her prayers, she was deeply impressed with the importance of complying with their requests. A few months before her death a friend said to her, “I have a cousin, whose situation is peculiarly favorable to self-examination. Do pray for him, Fanny; for he is very stupid.” About six weeks afterwards there was some reason to hope that he had found Christ, as his all in all.' It was said to Miss Woodbury, "Have you ever prayed for him?" She replied, "I have not once attempted to supplicate the throne of grace, with. out pleading on his behall."

She had a very deep sense of the worth and preciousness of time. But holy time was in her esteem by far the most precious. Very few, if any, could more feelingly, “call the Sabbath a delight.” Notwithstanding her difficulty of hearing, she had a remarkable fondness for public worship. To one, who often walked with her to the house of God in company, she was accustomed to say, when about to enter the sanciuary, "Now I do hope our souls will be richly fed." Do let us bear as for eternity," and the lik

Her religious sentiments were decidedly evangelical. The great doctrines of the cross were her meat and her drink, her joy and her glory. She often lamented the abounding errors of the day, especially that, which robs the Savior of Ivis divinity, by reducing him to the level of a dependent peios

leep!r imbibing the spirit of the doctrines which she lovi) and advocated, she seemed constantly to breathe forth Care Gel, aud good will to mankind. As a child, she

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