History of the Twenty-fourth Michigan of the Iron Brigade, Known as the Detroit and Wayne County Regiment ...

Front Cover
Winn & Hammond, 1891 - 483 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 424 - Now we are engaged in a great civil war testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure We are met on a great battle-field of that war We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live...
Page 303 - My friends, no one not in my position can appreciate the sadness I feel at this parting. To this people I owe all that I am. Here I have lived more than a quarter of a century ; here my children were born, and here one of them lies buried. I know not how soon I shall see you again. A duty devolves upon me which is, perhaps, greater than that which has devolved upon any other man since the days of Washington.
Page 151 - By direction of the President of the United States, I hereby assume command of the Army of the Potomac. As a soldier, in obeying this order an order totally unexpected and unsolicited I have no promises or pledges to make. The country looks to this army to relieve it from the devastation and disgrace of a hostile invasion.
Page 106 - The muffled drum's sad roll has beat The soldier's last tattoo; No more on life's parade shall meet That brave and fallen few. On Fame's eternal camping-ground Their silent tents are spread, And Glory guards, with solemn round, The bivouac of the dead.
Page 151 - ... sacrifices we may be called upon to undergo, let us have in view constantly the magnitude of the interests involved, and let each man determine to do his duty, leaving to an all-controlling Providence the decision of the contest. It is with just diffidence that I relieve, in the command of this army, an eminent and accomplished soldier, whose name must ever appear conspicuous in the history of its achievements ; but I rely upon the hearty support of my companions in arms to assist me in the discharge...
Page 309 - To achieve these glorious triumphs, and secure to yourselves, your fellow-countrymen, and posterity, the blessings of free institutions, tens of thousands of your gallant comrades have fallen, and sealed the priceless legacy with their blood. The graves of these, a grateful nation bedews with tears, honors their memories, and will ever cherish and support their stricken families.
Page 76 - The battles you have fought under my command will proudly live in our nation's history. The glory you have achieved, our mutual perils and fatigues, the graves of our comrades fallen in battle, and by disease, the broken forms of those whom wounds and sickness have disabled, the strongest associations which can exist among men, unite us still by an indissoluble tie. We shall ever be comrades in supporting the Constitution of our Country, and the nationality of its people.
Page 303 - A duty devolves upon me which is, perhaps, greater than that which has devolved upon any other man since the days of Washington. He never would have succeeded except for the aid of Divine Providence, upon which he at all times relied. I feel that I cannot succeed without the same Divine aid which sustained him, and...
Page 110 - Joseph Hooker. The short time that he has directed your movements has not been fruitful of victory, or any considerable advancement of our lines, but it has again demonstrated an amount of courage, patience, and endurance that under more favorable circumstances would have accomplished great results. Continue to exercise these virtues ; be true in your devotion to your country and the principles you have sworn to maintain; give to the brave and skillful general who has so long been identified with...
Page 168 - Horses fell, shrieking such awful cries as Cooper told of, and writhing themselves about in hopeless agony. The boards of fences, scattered by explosion, flew in splinters through the air. The earth, torn up in clouds, blinded the eyes of hurrying men; and through the branches of the trees and among the gravestones of the cemetery a shower of destruction crashed ceaselessly.

Bibliographic information