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Dial. VIII.—Answers to the Objections of a

wounded Conscience, drawn from the Grievous-

ness of his Sins ...

DIAL. IX.-Answers to the Objections of a wounded

Conscience, drawn from the Slightness of his Re-

pentance ...

........... 301

DIAL. X.-Answers to the Objections of a wounded

Conscience, drawn from the Feebleness of his

Faith ................................. 308

Dial. XI.—God alone can satisfy all Objections of

a wounded Conscience .................... 310

DIAL. XII.--Means to be used by wounded Con-

sciences for the recovering of Comfort ....... 313

DIAL. XIII.- Four wholesome Counsels for a

wounded Conscience to practise.............. 321

DIAL. XIV.-Comfortable Meditations for wounded

Consciences to muse upon .................. 325

DIAL. XV.—That is not always the greatest Sin

whereof a Man is guilty, wherewith his Conscience

is most pained for the present. ............... 330

Dial. XVI.-Obstructions hindering the speedy

flowing of Comfort into a troubled Soul........ 333

DIAL. XVII.—What is to be conceived of their final

Estate who die in a wounded Conscience without

any visible Comfort........................ 337

DIAL. XVIII.-Of the different Time and Manner

of the coming of Comfort to such who are healed

of a wounded Conscience .................. 342

DIAL. XIX.-How such who are completely cured

of a wounded Conscience are to demean them-

selves .................................. 246

DIAL. XX.-Whether one cured of a wounded Con-

science be subject to a Relapse .............. 350

DIAL. XXI.-Whether it be lawful to pray for, or

to pray against, or to praise God for a wounded

Conscience .......

.......... 353

The Conclusion of the Author to the Reader...... 357

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TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE THE LADY DALKEITH, LADY GOVERNESS TO HER HIGHNESS

THE PRINCESS HENRIETTA.

MADAM, TT is unsafe in these dangerous days for any - to go abroad without a convoy, or, at the least, a pass ; my book hath both in being dedicated to your honour. The apostle saith, Who planteth a vineyard, and eateth not of the fruit thereof? * I am one of your honour's planting, and could heartily wish, that the fruit I bring forth were worthy to be tasted by your judicious palate. Howsoever, accept these grapes, if not for their goodness, for their novelty : though not sweetest relished, they are soonest ripe, being the first fruits of Exeter press, presented unto you. And if ever my ingratitude should forget my obligations to your honour, these black lines will turn red, and blush his unworthiness that wrote them. In

* 1 Cor. ix. 7.

this pamphlet your ladyship shall praise whatsoever you are pleased but to pardon. But I am tedious, for your honour can spare no more minutes from looking on a better book, her infant Highness, committed to your charge. Was ever more hope of worth in a less volume? But 0! how excellently will the same, in due time, be set forth, seeing the paper is so pure, and your ladyship the overseer to correct the press ! The continuance and increase of whose happiness here, and hereafter, is desired in his daily devotions, who resteth

Your honour's in all

Christian service,

THOMAS FULLER.

GOOD THOUGHTS IN

BAD TIMES.

PERSONAL MEDITATIONS.

I ORD, how near was I to danger, yet es

caped! I was upon the brink of the brink of it, yet fell not in; they are well kept who are kept by thee. Excellent archer ! Thou didst hit thy mark in missing it, as meaning to fright, not hurt me. Let me not now be such a fool as to pay my thanks to blind Fortune for a favour which the eye of Providence hath bestowed upon me. Rather let the narrowness of my escape make my thankfulness to thy goodness the larger, lest my ingratitude justly cause, that, whereas this arrow but hit my hat, the next pierce my head.

II.

I ORD, when thou shalt visit me with a sharp L disease, I fear I shall be impatient; for I am choleric by my nature, and tender by my temper, and have not been acquainted with sickness all my lifetime. I cannot expect any kind usage

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