Charles Lamb

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Macmillan, 1895 - 191 pages
 

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Page 160 - Whose blood and judgment are so well commingled That they are not a pipe for fortune's finger To sound what stop she please. Give me that man That is not passion's slave, and I will wear him In my heart's core, ay, in my heart of heart, As I do thee.
Page 43 - All, all are gone, the old familiar faces. I loved a love once, fairest among women ; Closed are her doors on me, I must not see her—- All, all are gone, the old familiar faces. I have a friend, a kinder friend has no man ; Like an ingrate, I left my friend abruptly; Left him, to muse on the old familiar faces.
Page 190 - It was said of Socrates, that he brought philosophy down from heaven, to inhabit among men ; and I shall be ambitious to have it said of me, that I have brought philosophy out of closets and libraries, schools and colleges, to dwell in clubs and assemblies, at tea-tables and in coffee-houses.
Page 65 - So when an angel by divine command With rising tempests shakes a guilty land, Such as of late o'er pale Britannia past, Calm and serene he drives the furious blast, And, pleased the Almighty's orders to perform, 20 Rides in the whirlwind, and directs the storm.
Page 126 - Tis not in mortals to command success, But we'll do more, Sempronius; we'll deserve it.
Page 177 - I cannot but conclude the bulk of your natives to be the most pernicious race of little odious vermin, that nature ever suffered to crawl upon the surface of the earth.
Page 107 - But what meats? — Him thought he by the brook of Cherith stood, And saw the ravens with their horny beaks Pood to Elijah bringing even and morn; Though ravenous, taught to...
Page 138 - You have just met the most unhappy man on earth ; but on the subject of his wretchedness you must never ask a question.
Page 175 - He is now in his fifty-sixth year, cheerful, gay, and hearty; keeps a good house both in town and country; a great lover of mankind; but there is such a mirthful cast in his behaviour, that he is rather beloved than esteemed. His tenants grow rich, his servants look satisfied, all the young women profess love to him, and the young men are glad of his company.
Page 118 - ... committed to her by the owner, who preferred living in a newer and more fashionable mansion which he had purchased somewhere in the adjoining county ; but still she lived in it in a manner as if it had been her own, and kept up the dignity of the great house in a sort while she lived, which afterwards...

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