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fetched, and impossible etymologies. His vagaries

are bad enough when restricted to "Anglo-Saxon" CONTENT 8.- No 79.

etymologies, but when he embarks on the quest NOTES:- Records of Celtic Occupation, 1-' Fame's Memo- for “ Celtic" traces, he seems to divest himself of cedony-Bibliography of School Magazines, 5-A Century the last rag of common sense.

Forthwith every old - Price of Tobacco - St. Erkenwald—“Woman or thing assumes a Celtic tinge, and traces of "Female"-Bouter, 6.

Celtic occupation are found in every field. It is QUERIES :-Ranting, Roaring Willie'-Horton-Source of a question whether these frantic endeavours to -Jubilee of George III. -Marson of Holborn-Creature prove that we English are not ourselves, but someDrink, 7-West – Lee, King of the Gipsies - Society of body else, as Mr. Freeman puts it, arise from Friendly Brothers--La Russie Juive’-Scotland and Liberalism-Mackenzie's Manuscript-Pre-Existence-Matemans

& natural love of paradox, or from an indiscrimiSiege of Bolton-Westminster Abbey Tenor Bell, 8-Clai- pate attachment to the principle nullius addictus borne, of Westmoreland-Galileo-Extirp-Stocks and the jurare in verba magistri. The consideration that Folio-Orestes Brownson - John Frost -- Cargo- Country not one in a hundred of these “Celtic" claims is Box,' 1-King's End Car-Authors Wanted, 10.

ever substantiated does not seem to discourage REPLIES :-Religious Orders, 10-Bunhill Fields, 11–"De their manufacture. The fact that the people who fence, pot Defiance," 12-·Plea for the Midsummer Fairies' dabble in these so-called “ Celtic” etymologies -Goldwyer, 13-Jacob the Apostle--Earthquakes-Sir T. almost invariably choose Teutonic words to work not Families-Owner of Coat of Arms-Orpen-Yam-Anti- upon, disposes one to believe that there are no gugler-Jordeloo-Bluestockingism-Pycroft's, Oxford Me; Celtic elements in English local names. If there moirs,' 15" Another guess Noises-Sitwell, 16—Baroness Bellasis-To Rally,"Nom be, it is singular that they should so successfully de plume "-Arabella Churchill-Arms of Sir Francis Drake, elude the grasp of the army of "Celtic" etymoSwanns-Motto of Waterton Family-Scarlett : Anglin, 18 logists who so persistently dig for them. -Eddystone-Hampshire Plant-Names, 19.

MR. ADDY's offences are not so grave as those NOTES ON BOOKS:-Lumby's Ranulphi Higden Poly of the average "Celtic” advocate.

He wisely chronicon, Vol. ix.-Burrows's Family of Brocas of lets Welsh alone. But it is, nevertheless, a phonoBeaurepaire'-Benbam's Dictionary of Religion '-Brand's * London Life seen with German Eyes.'

logical offence to derive the surname Bright from

the A.-S. Bryt, a Briton. This A.-S. Bryt is a Notices to Correspondents, &c.

very exceptional designation for a Welshman. He

is mostly a Wealh; sometimes, to distinguish him Notes.

from the Wealas of Cornwall and Strathclyde, he

is a Bryt-Wealh. In one or two cases only is he RECORDS OF CELTIC OCCUPATION IN LOCAL a Bryt. No argument can be founded upon the NAMES,

Middle-English Brut, a Briton, for the use of this I am sorry to see that MR. ADDY (7th S. iii. 421) form arose from the erroneous derivation of Bryt is infected with the craze for discovering traces of from the Trojan Brutus, one of Geoffrey of MonCeltic occupation in English local names. MR. mouth's inventions. The phonological evidence is ADDY comes to the astounding conclusion that even stronger than this. Any one studying Middlethere existed, side by side with the English and English must be struck with the permanence of the Danish villages, settlements inhabited exclusively Teutonic guttural spirant and its distinct notation. by Celts, who kept themselves entirely distinct from Though it seems to have evaporated from the the Teutonic invaders. This is as difficult to be modern pronunciation, it was a distinct sound, lieve as Mr. Coote's conception that the Anglo- not produced without an effort, in M.E. I believe Saxons were simply a foreign standing army living there is no instance on record of this guttural entirely separate from the, of course, purely Celtic spirant being forced into a word. It is in all population, who would have been, apparently, still cases original. No phonologist will, therefore, bedrawn up in line resting on their weapons had not lieve that it was inserted in Bryt in the cases the Normans annihilated them at Hastings. Some cited by Mr. Addy, and every phonologist would of MR. ADDY's evidence is derived from field-names. hold that Bright is identical with the adjective Of late years a great deal of nonsense has been bright. And phonology, as usual, is right. The written about what we can learn from the study of instance of Brighton from Brighthelmston at once field-names. This study is not without its value; explains the origin of the surname Bright and its but I must protest against the notion that we are

use in local names.* Bright is here a shortening to revise our early history by the light it yields. of the personal name Bright-helm=A.-S. BeorhtBefore we can derive any lessons from these names

helm. There are many A.-S. names beginning they will have to be studied in accordance with, with the stem Beorht=bright. It is well estaband not in direct contravention to, the laws of philology. This latter method is in great favour (see · Cart, Sax., ii

, 72, 37; 595, 32), that is, the well of

* Similarly, Bright-well, Oxfordshire, is Beorhtan-wiell with the ordinary local etymologist, who has a man named *Beorht-a or a woman named * Beorht-e usually an intense passion for picturesque, far- | (the same name as Bertha).

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