The Philosophical Transactions ... Abridged ..., Volume 1

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Page 133 - That the colours of all natural bodies have no other origin than this, that they are variously qualified, to reflect one sort of light in greater plenty than another. And this I have experimented in a dark room, by illuminating those bodies with uncompounded light of divers colours. For by that means any body may be made to appear of any colour. They have there no appropriate colour, but ever appear of the colour of the light cast upon them, but yet with this difference, that they are most brisk...
Page 131 - Some rays are disposed to exhibit a red colour and no other; some a yellow and no other, some a green and no other, and so of the rest. Nor are there only rays proper and particular to the more eminent colours, but even to all their intermediate gradations.
Page 133 - I shall conclude with this general one. That the colours of all natural bodies have no other origin than this, that they are variously qualified, to reflect one sort of light in greater plenty than another.
Page 133 - And by this inequality of refractions they become not only coloured, but also very confused and indistinct. 10. Why the colours of the rainbow appear in falling drops of rain, is also from hence evident. For, those drops which refract the rays disposed to appear purple, in greatest quantity to the...
Page 130 - ... greater. And for the same reason, if the rays of light should possibly be globular bodies, and by their oblique passage out of one medium into another acquire a circulating motion, they ought to feel the greater resistance from the ambient aether, on that side where the motions conspire, and thence be continually bowed to the other.
Page 134 - You may also see, that if any of the colours at the lens be intercepted, the whiteness will be changed into the other colours.
Page 157 - But to examine how colours may be thus explained hypothetically is beside my purpose. I never intended to shew wherein consists the nature and difference of colours, but only to shew that de facto they are original and immutable qualities of the rays, which exhibit them...
Page 128 - Prism without, so that the Light might pass through it, and be refracted, before it was terminated by the Hole: But I found none of those Circumstances material. The Fashion of the Colours was in all these Cases the same.
Page 146 - To me the fundamental supposition itself seems impossible namely, that the waves or vibrations of any fluid can, like the rays of light, be propagated in straight lines, without a continual and very extravagant spreading and bending every way into the quiescent medium, where they are terminated by it. I mistake if there be not both experiment and demonstration to the contrary.
Page 134 - For, since Colours are the qualities of Light, having its Rays for their intire and immediate subject, how can we think those Rays qualities also, unless one quality may be the subject of and sustain another; which in effect is to call it Substance.

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