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The principal articles exported in 1864 were the following: Copper in bars,

$9,506,957 regulus,

4,714,912 Wheat, Flour,

2,321,090 Silver in bars,

1,638,272 Copper Ore,

1,268,588 Wheat,

1,039,071

The different countries to whose markets those productions were sent appear in the last statistical records in the following per centage:

England,
Peru,
France,
Australia,
North America,
California,
Germany,

58.41 pr. ct. of total exportation.
13.93
11.19
3.59
2.98
1.96
1.63

Refined sugar,

The principal articles of importation are marked thus for the same year (1864): Plain cotton goods,

$970,387

961,697 Cattle from Argentine Republic,

810,896 Calicoes,

689,291 Ground sugar, white and brown,

647,591 Coal,

574,395 Yerva Mate,

537,368

1861,

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The countries from which the imports were sent are
England,

43.46 per cent. France,

20.93 Germany,

9.11 Argentine Republic,

5.58 North America,

5.52 Peru,

3.99 Brazil,

3.92 The internal commerce by sea, and its wonderful increase, is shown by the following figures:

$16,696,921 1862

23,919,972 1863,

25,003,789 1864,

28,896,783 Increase over 1863,

3,892,994 1862,

4,977,811 1861,

12,199,862 In the foregoing statistics, the transit commerce from Chili to Bolivia and the Argentine Republic, which amounts to several millions, is not included.

After the general but accurate review of the commerce carried on during the year before last, we subjoin some other minute statistics, which we deem of interest to the general reader, about the commercial wealth of Chili. In 1855 the imports were $25,988,925 ; in 1856, $29,804,041; and in 1857, $31,800,209. The exports of 1855 were, $19,110,589, in 1856, $18,159,522; and in 1857, $20,126,461. The following table particularizes the exports of the latter year: Bars of gold and gold coin,

$497,736 Silver and silver ores,

4,725,655 Copper and copper ores,

10,760,589 1,050,718

798,112 Biscuit, bread, &c.

108,223 Barley,

257,970 Beans,

24,904 Peas and maize,

4,835 Potatoes,

35,506 Wine and chicha,

1,612 Nuts and dried and fresh fruits,

89,052 Salt beef,

10,880

Wheat, Flour,

Charqui, or jerked beef,

104,173 Butter and cheese,

36,055 Tallow and lard,

2,729 Hides, horns, and hoofs,

501,104 Goat, sheep, and chinchilla skins,

40,861 Wool,

397,643 Assorted provisions,

27,189 Dried fodder,

41,790 Cords, rope, and rigging,

18,464 Planks and lumber,

265,287 Coal,

176,765 Guano,

5,600 Miscellaneous,

143,009 Total,

$20,126,416 The principal imports are distilled spirits, ale and porter, alpaca goods, baizes, bedsteads, books, buttons, cabinet-ware, calicoes, candles, canvas, carpets, carriages, cassimeres, cigars, cloths, clothing, coal, cotton and

woollen goods, crape shawls, drugs, earthen and glass ware, gloves, gold in bars and coin, gunpowder, horned cattle and horses, household furniture, indigo, iron and iron goods, jewelry and cutlery, leather, linen goods, machinery, matches, yerva mate, merinó cloths, muslins, molasses, oils, paints, paper, perfumery, pianos, quicksilver, raisins, rice, rigging, salt, satin goods, shoes and boots, silks, silver coin and bars, soap, steel, straw goods, sugar, tea, tin, tobacco, umbrellas and parasols, velvets, watches, wax, wines, and wool shawls. The following table gives the quantities of sugar, coffee, tea, and iron imported from 1844 to 1855: Sugar, Coffee,

Iron, Years.

arrobas.

Tea, lbs. 1844,

245,217 1,939 26,713 38,600 1815,

330,307 1,722 31,552 52,963 1846,

607,427 1,941 25,227 18,991 1847

511,837 921 33,728 14,968 1848,

413,956 2,064 49,568 32,989 1849,

227,097 1,447 53,032 43,956 1850,

508,281 2,737 36,513 58,969 1851,

850,729 1,670 80,447 38,842 1852

730,757 4,188 104,207 115,835 1853,

711,635 3,069 65,895 14,176 1854,

731,427 2,954 89,960 52,859 1855,

1,513,815 4,518 112,264 155,740

cut.

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The imports of sugar into Valparaiso from January 1 to August 15, 1858, were 336,926 arrobas of 125 pounds each, and the stock on hand at the latter period was 94,000 arrobas.

The exports to England were, in 1854, £1,380,563; in 1855, £1,925,271; and in 1856, £1,700,776. The imports of English produce were, in 1852, £1,167,494; in 1853, £1,264,942; in 1854, £1,421,855; in 1855, £1,330,385; and in 1856, £1,946,010 The imports of foreign and colonial produce from England were, in 1854, £43,589; in 1855, £56,688; and in 1856, £64,492. The English exports to Chile in the half-year ending June 30, 1858, were £602,956, showing a decrease of £120,492 compared with the same period of 1857. The exports of Chili to France were $218,000 in 1851, $250,000 in 1852, $240,000 in 1853, $650,000 in 1854, and $930,000 in 1855. The imports from France were $4,800,000 in 1851, $3,550,000 in 1852, $4,400,000 in 1853, $4,000,000 in 1854, and $5,600,000 in 1855. The commercial intercourse of Chili with the United States has been very variable. In the earlier years of Californian emigration she sent large quantities of flour, grain, and lumber to that State, and took freely of our goods in return. Since that time her exports to this country have continued in large amount, but she receives little except money in return, the balances being mostly settled in Europe, where she is a debtor. The following table shows the amount of her commerce with the United States for seve

ral years:

EXPORTS.

IMPORTS. 1849, $3,589,888 1849,

$1,100,345 1850, 4,012,612 1850,

1,911,479 1851, 3,515,235 1851,

4,594,211 1852, 2,062,160' 1852,

2,048,836 1853, 2,214,153 1853,

2,157,320 1856, 2,467,819 1856,

276,389 1857, 3,742,349 1857,

433,957 The following table of a more recent date shows how little the commercial intercourse between Chili and the United States has increased, or, rather, how greatly it has diminished since the late civil war in this country:

FOREIGN IMPORTS IN 1864 AND 1865.

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None.

1864. Rice

$103,159 Sugar, raw, white and brown

644,027 Sugar, refined

958,746 Coal

84,695 Kerseymere

311,452 Beer

135,316 Cotton drilling

394,786 White shirtings

966,833 Mixed goods

444,203 Bagging stuffs

335,686 Woollen shawls

283,139 Cloths.

177,811 Prints

688,767 Ready made clothing 232,813 Empty bags

253,967 Straw hats

173,419 Cottons

419,276 Paraguay tea

535,177

614,564

1,652 1,312,026 184,904

156,802 240 304,053 236 132,865

388,540 1,021,397

395,124 339,474 107,826 182,941 599,693 161,159 236,364 143,640 394,329 343,459

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“If our merchants," said the able newspaper, already referred to, commenting on these extraordinary figures, " let this growing trade of Chili rest in English hands, they will show themselves less wise and less enterprising than they are reputed to be. There is no reason, with our ports on the Pacific side, why we should not do almost the whole of the carrying trade of Chili; and certainly we ought, in the next two or three years, to quadruple our commerce with that country, which is, as we have already shown, one of the most thriving in South America.”

It is a very singular fact, that the blockade of Chili, in the last four months of 1865, far from lessening the exportation of the products of the country, has increased them to a wonderful extent, as shown by the following statistics which one of the leading papers of New York (the “ Evening Post,” of February 27) has lately published, with an appropriate commentary ưpon the immense quantity of provisions furnished by the fertility of Chili to the markets of the world:

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