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CHISWICK PRESS:C. WHITTINGHAM AND CO. TOOKS COURT,

CHANCERY LANE.

VII. Letters to Barton—Important Critical Declaration on

William Blake-Views on Byron and Shelley-Letters

to Cary, Mrs. Collier, Procter-Death of Munden 170

VIII. Emancipation from the India House-Letters to Barton,

Novello, Allsop, Miss Hutchinson, the Wordsworths-

Hazlitt's “ Spirit of the Age”

192

IX. Letters to Barton, Southey, Leigh Hunt, Robinson,

Coleridge, &c.

207

X. Correspondence with Hazlitt, Coleridge, Barton, Moxon,

Hone, Allsop, Haydon, and Novello
XI. Letters to Cary, Barton, Patmore, Mrs. Shelley, Stod-

dart, Hood, &c.

248

XII. Letters to Ollier, Robinson, Barton, Leigh Hunt, Cowden

Clarke, &c.—Lamb takes a House at Enfield

273

XIII. Letters to Blanchard, Barton, and Allsop-Acquaintance

with Procter and Correspondence with him

290

XIV. Letters to Clarke, Robinson, Barton, Wilson, Novello,

Coleridge, &c.

306

XV. Letters to Barton, Wilson, and Gilman

XVI. Letters to Barton, Gilman, Ayrton, Southey, Novello,

Mrs. Hazlitt-Lamb's Album Verses-Death of Hazlitt 343

XVII. Accession of William IV.-Letters to Barton, Novello,

Dyer, Taylor, Cary, and Moxon—The “ Englishman's

Magazine

364

XVIII. The - Englishman's Magazine ” a' Failure - Letters to

Moxon-Recollections of Munden-Letter to Landor—

Notes to Miss Matilda Betham-Last Letter to Coleridge 381

XIX. Letters to Moxon, Talfourd, and Forster-Last Letter

to the Hazlitts

392

XX. Reconciliation with Godwin – Marriage of Emma Isola-

Letters to Forster, Moxon, Cary, and Rogers

411

XXI. Letters to Miss Fryer, Wordsworth, Cary, &c.—Death

of Coleridge— Last Letters— The Meeting at Taifourd's

between Lamb and some of his surviving Associates 426

XXII. Lamb's Reading, Habits, and Opinions— Wordsworth’s

Epitaph

442

Additional Notes

454

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BOOK III.-(CONTINUED).

CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN 1801 AND 1820.

CHAPTER XV.

LETTERS TO MANNING AND THE WORDSWORTHS.

[1815.]

THE following letter to Mrs. Wordsworth's sister, who

resided with the poet at Rydal, relates to matters of more domestic and personal interest. He returns to the subject of his irksome duties at the India House, of which he has already spoken so bitterly in some former letters; and in one to Miss Matilda Betham, of September 30 this year

he remarks, “ Your letter has found me in such a distressed state, owing partly to my situation at home, and partly to perplexities at my office, that I am constrained to relin

further revision of Marie, to which there is a reference in the letter to his fair correspondent of the 1st of June next (1816). Miss Bethanı seems to have resorted pretty freely to Lamb for his assistance and advice. There is another letter to her, in which he says :-“I return you by a careful hand the MSS. Did I not ever love your verses ? The domestic leaf will be a meet heirloom to have in the family. 'Tis fragrant with cordiality. What friends

you must have had, or dreamed of having !"

quish any

TO MISS HUTCHINSON.

“ Thursday, 19th Oct., 1815. “ Dear Miss H., I am forced to be the replier to your letter, for Mary has been ill, and gone from home these five weeks yesterday. She has left me very lonely and very miserable. I stroll about; but there is no rest but at one's own fireside ; and there is no rest for me there now. I look forward to the worse half being past, and keep up as well as I can. She has begun to show some favourable symptoms. The return of her disorder has been frightfully soon this time, with scarce a six months' interval. I am almost afraid my worry of spirits about the E. I. House was. partly the cause of her illness; but one always imputes it to the cause next at hand; more probably it comes from some cause we have no control over or conjecture of. It cuts sad great slices out of the time, the little time, we shall have to live together.

I don't know but the recurrence of these illnesses might help me to sustain her death better than if we had had no partial separations. But I won't talk of death. I will imagine us immortal, or forget that we are otherwise. By God's blessing, in a few weeks we may be making our meal together, or sitting in the front row of the Pit at Drury lane, or taking our evening walk past the theatres, to look at the outside of them, at least, if not to be tempted in. Then we forget we are assailable ; we are strong for the time as rocks ;- the wind is tempered to the shorn Lambs.' Poor C. Lloyd and poor

Priscilla ! I feel I hardly feel enough for him; my own calamities press about me, and involve me in a thick integument not to be reached at by other folks' misfortunes. But I feel all I can—all the kindness I can, towards you allGod bless you! I hear nothing from Coleridge. “ Yours truly,

“ C. LAMB.”

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The following letters best speak for themselves :

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