The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, for the Year ..., Volume 91, Part 1

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Edw. Cave, 1736-[1868], 1821
 

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Page 106 - When that this body did contain a spirit, A kingdom for it was too small a bound; But now two paces of the vilest earth Is room enough.
Page 352 - The mother of Sisera looked out at a window and cried through the lattice Why is his chariot so long in coming? why tarry the wheels of his chariots?
Page 30 - From Heaven my strains begin: from Heaven descends The flame of genius to the human breast, And love and beauty, and poetic joy And inspiration. Ere the radiant sun Sprang from the east, or 'mid the vault of night The moon suspended her serener lamp; Ere mountains, woods, or streams...
Page 8 - The righteous perisheth, and no man layeth it to heart : and merciful men are taken away, none considering that the righteous is taken away from the evil to come.
Page 66 - Superior beings, when of late they saw A mortal man unfold all nature's law, Admir'd such wisdom in an earthly shape, And shew'da Newton as we shew an ape.
Page 136 - The lonely mountains o'er and the resounding shore a voice of weeping heard and loud lament ; from haunted spring and dale edged with poplar pale the parting Genius is with sighing sent; with flower-inwoven tresses torn the nymphs in twilight shade of tangled thickets mourn.
Page 397 - He has nothing for it but to abdicate, and run from an evil which he can neither prevent nor mollify. The husband gone, the ceremony begins. The walls are...
Page 8 - Surely the Lord is in this place. This is none other but the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven.
Page 74 - I have recently received so many testimonies from all parts of my kingdom ; and which, whilst it is most grateful to the strongest feelings of my heart, I shall ever consider as the best and surest safeguard of my throne.
Page 398 - ... inasmuch as the defendant was in the exercise of a legal right, and not answerable for the consequences ; and so the poor gentleman was doubly nonsuited, for he lost not only his suit of clothes, but his suit at law.

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