The ancient history of the Egyptians, Carthaginians [&c.] Transl, Volume 5

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Page 252 - I will go before thee, and make the crooked places straight: I will break in pieces the gates of brass, and cut in sunder the bars of iron. And I •will give thee the treasures of darkness, and hidden riches of secret places. 1
Page 113 - there any that could deliver out of his hand, but he did according to his will, and became great. And as I was considering, behold, an he goat came from the west, on the face of the whole earth, and, touched not the ground; and the goat had a notable horn between his eyes. And he came to the
Page 300 - It shall never be inhabited, neither shall it be dwelt in from generation to generation—neither shall the shepherds make their fold there." Heaven and earth would sooner have* passed away, than
Page 100 - The Lord hath purposed it, to stain the pride of all glory, and to bring into contempt all the honourable of the earth." * Her fall will drag after it the ruin of trade in general,
Page 252 - and I will loose the loins of kings, to open before him the two-leaved gates; and the gates shall not be shut: I will go before thee, and make the crooked places straight: I will break in pieces the gates of brass, and cut in sunder the bars of iron. And I •will give thee the treasures of darkness, and hidden riches of secret places.
Page 300 - I will also make it a possession for the bittern, and pools of water: and I will sweep it with the besom of destruction—
Page 77 - of thy extraction; but I should be glad to " know with what frame of mind thou didst bear " thy poverty."—" Would to the gods (replied he) " that I may bear this crown with equal patience. " These hands have procured me all I desired ; and " whilst .1 possessed nothing, I wanted nothing.
Page 204 - we make use of, both with our friends, and against " our enemies. To our friends we give corn, which " we procure by the labour of our oxen; with them " we offer wine to the gods in our cup: and with " regard to our enemies, we combat them at a
Page 205 - being contracted between equals; and they " are esteemed equals, who have not tried their " strength against each other: but do not imagine, " that those whom thou conquerest can love thee; " for there is no such thing as friendship between a " master and his slave, and a forced peace is soon " followed by a war.
Page 204 - neither command over, nor submit to any man. " And that thou mayest be sensible what kind of " people the Scythians are, know, that we received " from heaven, as a rich present, a yoke of oxen, a " plough-share, a dart, a javelin, and a cup. These

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