Hume and Smollett's Celebrated History of England, from Its First Settlement to the Year 1760

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D.F. Robinson, 1827 - 496 pages
 

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Page 275 - And sometimes he would say thus to them, " Gentlemen, at London you are like ships in a sea, which show like nothing ; but in your country villages you are like ships in a river, which look like great things.
Page 265 - I would advise you, as you tender your life, to devise some excuse to shift off your attendance at this parliament : for God and man have concurred to punish the wickedness of this time. And think not slightly of this advertisement, but retire yourself into your country, where you may expect the event in safety. For though there be no appearance of any stir, yet, I say, they shall receive a terrible blow this parliament, and yet they shall not see who hurts them.
Page 231 - Christ was the word that spake it; He took the bread and brake it; And what the word did make it, That I believe, and take it.
Page 261 - She answered with a faint voice, that as she had held a regal sceptre, she desired no other than a royal successor.
Page 271 - He acknowledged twenty-eight articles; and was sentenced to pay a fine of forty thousand pounds, to be imprisoned in the Tower during the king's pleasure, to be for ever incapable of any office, place, or employment, and never again to sit in Parliament, or come within the verge of the court.
Page 23 - Alfred himself complains, that on his accession he knew not one person, south of the Thames, who could so much as interpret the Latin service; and very few in the northern parts, who had reached even that pitch of erudition.
Page 21 - Nature also, as if desirous that so bright a production of her skill should be set in the fairest light, had bestowed on him all bodily accomplishments, vigour of limbs, dignity of shape and air, and a pleasant, engaging, and open countenance.
Page 137 - King-maker, had distinguished himself by his gallantry in the field, by the hospitality of his table, by the magnificence, and still more by the generosity of his expense, and by the spirited and bold manner which attended him in all his actions. The undesigning frankness and openness of his character rendered his conquest over men's affections the more certain and infallible : his presents were regarded as sure testimonies of esteem and friendship, and his professions as the overflowings of his...
Page 224 - Be of good cheer, brother," cried he, " we shall this day kindle such a torch in England, as, I trust in God, shall never be extinguished.
Page 317 - Consider, it will soon carry you a great way; it will carry you from earth to heaven; and there you shall find, to your great joy, the prize to which you hasten, a crown of glory.

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