The Herbartian Psychology Applied to Education

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Heath & Company, 1898 - 284 pages
 

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Page 252 - My theory, on the contrary, is that the bodily changes follow directly the perception of the exciting fact, and that our feeling of the same changes as they occur is the emotion.
Page 253 - If we fancy some strong emotion, and then try to abstract from our consciousness of it all the feelings of its bodily symptoms, we find we have nothing left behind, no 'mind-stuff...
Page 1 - ... from turning round their heads. Above and behind them a fire is blazing at a distance, and between the fire and the prisoners there is a raised way; and you will see, if you look, a low wall built along the way, like the screen which marionette players have in front of them, over which they show the puppets.
Page 1 - You have shown me a strange image, and they are strange prisoners. Like ourselves, I replied; and they see only their own shadows, or the shadows of one another, which the fire throws on the opposite wall of the cave? True, he said; how could they see anything but the shadows if they were never allowed to move their heads?
Page 209 - A little Cyclops, with one eye Staring to threaten and defy, That thought comes next and instantly The freak is over, The shape will vanish, and behold ! A silver shield with boss of gold That spreads itself, some faery bold In fight to cover.
Page 154 - HAMLET. Do you see yonder cloud that's almost in shape of a camel ? POLONIUS. By the mass, and 'tis like a camel, indeed. HAMLET. Methinks it is like a weasel. POLONIUS. It is backed like a weasel. HAMLET. Or like a whale? POLONIUS. Very like a whale.
Page 1 - AND NOW, I said, let me show in a figure how far our nature is enlightened or unenlightened: Behold! human beings living in an underground den, which has a mouth open towards the light and reaching all along the den...
Page 261 - We can only have the highest happiness, such as goes along with being a great man, by having wide thoughts, and much feeling for the rest of the world as well as...
Page 34 - It being that term which, I think, serves best to stand for whatsoever is the object of the understanding when a man thinks...
Page 145 - I have already explained to you that what is out of the common is usually a guide rather than a hindrance. In solving a problem of this sort, the grand thing is to be able to reason backwards.

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