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Brown, John, early career, 68;

antagonism to slavery, 69;
in Kansas, 70; Pottawatomie
massacre, 70; scheme of
negro mountain stronghold,
Kansas Regulars," 71;
71;
arms from Massachusetts
committee, 71, 72; plan re-
vealed to friends, 72-74;
in Canada "constitution,
74; plan betrayed and post-
poned, 75; duplicity in trans-
fer of Kansas committee
rifles, 75, 76; return to Kan-
sas, 76; Missouri raid, 77; at
Kennedy farm, 77, 82; plan
betrayed to secretary of war,
78; orders for attack on
Harper's Ferry, 78; execu-
tion of attack, 79; fighting
with militia, 80; captured
by marines, 80; after capt-
ure, 81; treatment of prison-
ers, 81; trial, 82; hanged,
82; conduct during trial, 82;
effect at the North, 83; con-
duct of the South, 84; action
and that of abettors con-
demned, 84 - 46; folly of
scheme, 87; hope for a slave
rising, 88; unfitness for lead-
ership, 89; rebound of north-
ern sentiment, 89, 104; con-
gressional inquiry, 96; Doug-
las on raid, 97; bibliography,
350.

Brown, Oliver, Harper's Ferry
raid, killed, 80.

Brown, Owen, Harper's Ferry
raid, 77; escape, 81.
Brown, Watson, Harper's Ferry
raid, killed, 80.
Buchanan, James, and Cuba
and Mexico, 61, 106; Covode
inquiry, 105; responsibility
for Democratic split, 133;
cabinet attitude on secession,
151; influence of Trescot,
152; and reinforcement of

Charleston forts (Dec.), 153,
154; bluffed to prevent rein-
forcements, 154-156, 188;
assured of South Carolina's
immediate secession, 156;
and South Carolina congress-
men, 157; passive attitude
as to forts, 158; and Cass's
resignation, 158; passive at-
titude promotes secession,
159; and Black's opinion on
collecting revenue and de-
fending property, 159-161;
policy of delay, 161; failure,
161, 184; message, 162-164;
and Scott's advice on rein-
forcement, 186; result of
failure to follow it, 187-189;
and instructions to Anderson,
199; and Pickens's demand
for Sumter, 201-204; and re-
moval to Sumter, 211-213;
and South Carolina com-
missioners, 213-215; reply to
commissioners, 215-218; their
rejoinder, 218; change in atti-
tude, 219, 246; appoints col-
lector for Charleston, 220;
message on finances and se-
cession, 220; and Star of the
West expedition, 224, 225;
promises support to Ander-
son, 234; rejects Ward's plan
of relief, 237; and Fox's plan,
238; and demand for Sum-
ter, 240; and Sumter truce,
241, 261, 269; and Fort
Pickens, 249-251; continued
peace delusion, 262; char-
acter in the crisis, 262; and
Washington birthday parade,
263; and Lincoln, 285; bib-
liography of administration,
343-352; biographies, 348,
349.

Buell, D. C., instructions to
Anderson, 198.

Bullock, E. C., advice on seces-
sion, 136.

Burlingame, Anson, in Con- | Charleston Harbor forts, Bu-

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CABINET, Buchanan's, 151;
changes in it, 158, 215, 245;
Davis's, 255; and congress
under Confederate constitu-
tion, 256, 258; Lincoln's
consultation on, 280-282;
Lincoln's, 287.
Calhoun, J. C., and secession,
37, 46; belief in slavery, 37;
responsibility for slavery agi-
tation, 38-40; sole justifica-
tion of attitude, 40; unaffect-
ed by modern progress, 40;
on slavery as a social neces-
sity, 41; character of his
Unionism, 42; and nullifica-
tion, 43; resolutions of 1833,
43-46; and Wilmot proviso,
47; his remedy in 1847, 47;
final utterance on question,
48.

Cameron, Simon, vote for, in

Republican convention, 119;
selected for war portfolio,
281; and relief of Sumter,
295, 306; and relief expedi-
tion, 307.
Campbell, J. A., advises Seward

to reply to Confederate com-
missioners, 298; evacuation
negotiations with Seward,
298-300, 308–311.
Cass, Lewis, and secession, 151;
and reinforcement of forts,
153, 154; resigns, 158.
Central America, filibustering
and slavery, 61; bibliogra-
phy, 352.

Chandler, Zachariah, in Senate,
90; on Peace Convention,
273.
Charleston, decay, 64. See also
Charleston Harbor.

chanan's cabinet on rein-
forcement (Dec.), 153, 154;
conspiracy to prevent rein-
forcement, 154-158; Buchan-
an's passive attitude, 158,
159; Buchanan's message on,
163; Scott advises reinforce-
ment (Oct.), 184; available
force, 185; probable effect of
reinforcement before seces-
sion, 186-189; condition,
189-191, 195; Moultrie re-
paired, 191; Gardner asks
reinforcement, 191; attempt-
ed removal of ammunition,
192; Anderson supersedes
Gardner, 192, 194; Porter's
report, 193; Anderson ad-
vises reinforcement and occu-
pation of Pinckney and Sum-
ter, 194-197; Charleston and
work on forts, 196; and state
enrolment of fort laborers,
197; Buell's instructions to
Anderson, 198; Buchanan
modifies these, 199; Pinck-
ney occupied, 200; forty-
muskets episode, 200; state
demands Sumter, 201; de-
mand withdrawn, 202; Bu-
chanan's draught reply to
demand, 203; state patrol,
205; Anderson's prepara-
tions for removal to Sumter,
206; removal accomplished,
206-209; flag-raising at Sum-
ter, 209; consequent excite-
ment, 210; Anderson refuses
to return, 210; state occupies
other forts, 211; Buchanan
and removal, 211-213; com-
missioners' demand, 213-215;
cabinet council, 215; Black's
memorandum on demand,
216, 217; Buchanan's reply to
commissioners, 217; their re
joinder, 218; new collector,
220; Scott's advice (Dec.),

223; Star of the West, 224-234;
Anderson promised support,
234; his confidence, 234;
unfortunate effect of this,
235; Black's memorandum
on, 235, 236; Scott's reply,
237; Ward's plan to relieve,
237; Fox's plan, 237; harbor
entrance obstructed, 239; de-
mand for surrender of Sum-
ter (Jan.), 239; one-sided
truce, 239-241, 251, 261, 269;
secessionist game of delay,
239, 240, 268, 290, 303, 309;
Pickens's letter on delivery
of Sumter, 240; Confederacy
assumes control of question,
259; Pickens urges attack,
260; Beauregard in com-
mand, 260; urges prevention
of Sumter reinforcement,
261; first attitude of Lin-
coln's cabinet, 289; Lincoln
recognizes necessity of retain-
ing Sumter, 289, 341; food
problem at Sumter, 290, 321,
322; responsibility for this,
290-292; Lincoln's determi-
nation, 292; Scott advises
against relief, 293; renewal
of Fox's plan, 293; first cab-
inet consultation on relief,
294-296; Seward announces
intended abandonment, 296;
Seward - Campbell negotia-
tions, 298-301, 308-311; Con-
federates discount Seward's
statements, 301, 309, 310;
Seward's sincerity, 302, 311;
Douglas urges withdrawal,
302; public interest, 302;
Republican sentiment, 302;
Anderson and Fox's plan,
304; Lamon's unauthorized
statements, 305, 308, 321;
second cabinet meeting on
relief, 306; relief expedition
ordered, 307; Lincoln in-
forms Pickens of relief, 310,

327; preparation of expedi-
tion, 312, 313, 331-333; and
Pensacola relief expedition,
314; another vessel fired on,
322; Anderson fears aban-
donment, 323, 324; Con-
federates ready for attack,
324; knowledge of Fox expe-
dition, 324-326; Sumter iso-
lated, 324; conditions before
the attack, 326; preparation
at Sumter, 327; Confederate
batteries, 328; attack order-
ed, 329; demand for evacua-
tion made, 330; Anderson's
remark on shortage, 330; his
offer declined, 331; relief ex-
pedition at the bar, 333;
bombardment, first day, 334-
336; fire in Sumter, 336, 337;
second day, 337; surrender,
338-340; effect of relief ex-
pedition, 340; bibliography,
344, 351.

Chase, S. P., candidacy for
presidential nomination, 116;
votes for, 119; Wilson on
candidacy, 120; selected for
treasury portfolio, 281; and
relief of Sumter, 295, 306;
bibliography, 350.

Chesnut, James, resigns from
Senate, 168; and Sumter,

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Clark, J. B., on Impending

Crisis, 91.

Clay, C. C., and Sumter, 240,
241; manifesto of southern
congressmen, 242.
Clay, Henry, on curse of sla-
very, 18; fatuity of his com-
promise (1833), 43; Union-
ism and slavery, 49.
Clingman, T. L., on secession
and Lincoln's election, 167.
Cobb, Howell, and secession,

151, 153; and reinforcement
of forts, 153; candidacy for
Confederate presidency, 253.
Cobb, T. R. R., advocacy of
secession, 144.

Coercion and enforcement of

laws, 160, 163, 266, 282, 283.
Colfax, Schuyler, in Congress,

go.

Colorado, territory organized,
183.

Commerce, effect of steam on
southern foreign, 15; value
of export of cotton, 29; decay
of South Carolina, 65.
Compact theory, Calhoun and
Webster on, 44.
Compromise, Buchanan's sug-

gested amendments, 163;
congressional committees to
consider, 166, 172; South
does not desire, 167-169;
Dunn's resolution, 169; Wade
on, 169; Crittenden com-
promise, 170-172; Senate
committee rejects it, 172;
Republican offer, 172; Lin-
coln's attitude, 172, 176, 180,
181, 279, 280; amendment
guaranteeing state slavery,
173, 178-180, 284, 286; com-
mittee reports failure, 173;
popularity of Crittenden,
173-175; Weed's, 174; Re-
publican responsibility for
rejection, 175-177, 180; at-
tempted popular vote on,

177; House committee re-
ports, 178; justification of Re-
publican opposition, 181–183;
Buchanan's message, 221;
hopeless, 222; Buchanan
clings to idea, 261-263; call
of Peace Convention, 268-
270; meeting, 270-272; re-
sult, 272, 273; public disap-
pointment over failure, 274.
Compromise of 1850, Calhoun
on, 48; Clay's attitude, 49;
wisdom of Webster's speech,
50-52.

Confederate States, states form-
ing, 3; formation advised,
169, 242; convention to form,
251; provisional congress,
252; officers elected, 253;
financial measures, 254; takes
over Federal questions, 254;
Davis's inaugural, 255; com-
missioners to Washington,
256; constitution, 256-258;
founded on slavery, 258;
reception of commissioners,
297, 311.

Congress, Thirty-sixth: com-
plexion, 90, 95; prominent
members, 90; speakership
contest, 91; imminence of
conflict, 92, 94; threats of
disunion, 93; answer to
threats, 93, 95; Harper's Fer-
ry raid, 96; Douglas on Re-
publican party, 97; Davis's
distribution of arms bill, 98;
Davis's resolutions, 99-101,
104; Seward's speech on
slavery, 102-104; disorders,
105; no slavery legislation,
105; Covode inquiry, 105;
Mexican treaty, 107; naval
estimates cut down, 124, 125;
Sumner's speech on slavery,
125; annual message (1860),
162-164; and Anderson, 220;
message of January 8, 220;
House resolution on Charles-

ton forts, 221; withdrawal of
southerners, 253. See also
Compromise.

Conkling, Roscoe, in Congress,

90.

Constitution, interpretations of
Calhoun and Webster, 43-46;
Confederate compared with
Federal, 256-259.
Constitutional Union party,
nominees and platform, 114;
vote for, 132.
Continental Congress and slave-
trade (1776), 5.
Conway, M. D., on John Brown,
83.
Coppoc, Barclay, Harper's Fer-
ry raid, 78.

Corwin, Thomas, and compro-
mise, 178-180.
Cotton, necessity of slave cult-

ure, 7, 8; growth of produc-
tion, 9; character of culture,
9; importance as export, 29;
basis of "cotton is king," 30,
104; Confederate export, 254.
Covode inquiry, 105.
Cox, S. S, in Congress, 90.
Crawford, M. J., disunion threat

(1859), 93; commissioner to
Washington, 256; on Bu-
chanan, 262; on Lincoln's
inaugural, 287; and Seward,
297, 298, 311; and Seward-
Campbell negotiation, 298-
301, 308, 311; on Lincoln's
intentions, 323.

Crawford, S W., and removal
to Sumter, 208.
Crittenden, J. J., on Calhoun,

38; compromise propositions,
170-172; committee of thir-
teen, 172; and popular vote
on amendment, 177; and
Peace Convention compro-
mise, 273; bibliography, 349.
Crittenden compromise, provi-
sions, 170-172; rejected by
Senate committee, 172; pop-

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DAKOTA, territory organized,
183.

Davis, H. W., in Congress, 90.
Davis, J. C., occupies Castle
Pinckney, 200.

Davis, Jefferson, on constitu-
tional cause of secession, 12;
on climatic limitations of
slavery, 52; distribution of
arms bill, 98; resolutions on
state rights and slavery, 99-
IOI, 104; on sectional hostil-
ity and secession, 148; ad-
vises secession and confedera-
tion, 169; committee of
thirteen, 172; and Critten-
den compromise, 172, 175;
and removal to Sumter, 212;
manifesto of southern con-
gressmen, 242; and secession
as conspiracy, 243-245; Con-
federate provisional presi-
dent, 253; withdraws from
Senate, 254; reluctant ac-
ceptance of presidency, 254;
foresees war, 254; inaugural,
255; cabinet, 255; and Sew-
ard's peace statements, 301,
303; bibliography, 348, 350.
Davis, Reuben, in Congress, 90;
bibliography, 349.

De Bow, J. D. B., on slavery in
Missouri, 23; and reopening
of slave-trade, 62.
Debt, Confederate loans, 254.

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