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De Jarnette, D. C., on Lincoln's culture, Cotton, Finances,
inaugural, 287.
Manufactures, Tariff.
Delaware, slave population Edwards, Jonathan, slave-own-
(1860), 21; instructions to er, 6.
Peace Convention delegates, |
271.

Democratic party, division
(1860), 98-101. See also Elec-
tions.

Elections, 1860: Lincoln's elec-
tion as reason for secession,
93, 96, 129, 133, 137, 139,
144, 167; Democratic split,
98-101; Democratic conven-
tion, reports on platform,
109-112; adoption of Doug-
las platform, 113; secession
of southern members, 113;
ineffectual balloting, adjourn-
ment, 113; seceders conven-
tion, 113, 115; Constitutional
Union nominees and plat-
form, 114; second secession
of Democratic convention,
further secession, 115; nomi-
nation of Douglas, 115; nom-
ination of Breckinridge, 116;
Republican convention, prom-
inent candidates, 116; plat-
form, 117, 118; balloting,
119; nomination of Lincoln,
119; its basis, 119-123; Lin-
coln's election foreshadowed,
126; protection as issue, 126;
Republicans belittle secession
issue, 126, 127; Seward's mag-
nanimity and speeches, 130–
132; Douglas's southern tour
and denunciation of secession,
127-130; attempt to concen-
trate opposition to Lincoln,
128; vote, election of Lincoln,
132; expectation of no popu-
lar election, 134.
Everett, Edward, nominated for

vice president, 114; on Crit-
tenden compromise, 173.

Dimick, Justin, and relief of
Sumter, 224.

Dix, J. A., on Crittenden's
amendment, 173; secretary
of the treasury, 245; and Bu-
chanan, 246; flag despatch,
246; on public opinion and
Sumter, 302; bibliography,

350.

Doubleday, Abner, and re-

moval to Sumter, 207.
Douglas, S. A., responsibility

for Kansas-Nebraska act, 58;
propitiatory bill (1860), 96;
on Harper's Ferry raid and
Republican party, 97; mar-
plot, 98; southern opposi-
tion to candidacy, 98, 109;
Davis's attack on Freeport
Doctrine, 99-101; and Dem-
ocratic platform, 109-113;
balloting for, 113; nominated,
115; fears secession issue, 127;
refuses to withdraw, 128; ex-
pects Lincoln's election, 128;
southern tour, denounces se-
cession, 128-130; popular and
electoral vote for, 132; com-
mittee of thirteen, 172; and
Peace Convention compro-
mise, 273; and Lincoln, 285; |
urges withdrawal from Sum-
ter, 302.
Douglass, Frederick, and John
Brown, 71, 74.
Dunn, W. M., conciliatory reso-
lution, 169.

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ECONOMIC Conditions, bibliog-
raphy, 351.
See also Agri-

FAULKNER, C. J., defends John
Brown, 82.

Faunce, John, Sumter relief ex-
pedition, 332.
Federal Convention, slave com-
promises, 5.

Finances, bad condition, 221;, Fox, G. V., plan to relieve

improvement, 246; first Con-
federate measures, 254; pro-
visions in Confederate con-
stitution, 256, 257:
Fitzpatrick, Benjamin, declines
vice-presidential nomination,

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115.

Fletcher, Captain, Sumter relief
expedition, 333.
Floyd, J. B., and John Brown's
plan, 78; and secession, 151;
traitorous intent, 151; and
reinforcement of Charleston
forts, 153, 154; conspiracy to
prevent reinforcement, 154-
156; and forty-muskets epi-
sode, 191, 200; and transfer
of ammunition, 192; removes
Gardner, 192: vacillation on
forts, 193; and state enrol-
ment of fort laborers, 197; in-
structions to Anderson, 198;
and removal to Sumter, 211,
213 resigns, 215.
Forbes, Hugh, and John Brown,
72. 75, 76.

Foreign affairs, bibliography,
352. See also nations by

name.

Forsyth. John, commissioner
to Washington, 256, 297;
and Seward, 297, 298, 311;
and Seward-Campbell nego-
tiations, 298-301, 308-311.
Forts, southern, Scott advises
reinforcement (Oct.), 184;
force available for, 185; prob-
able result of reinforcement
before secession, 187-189;
seized by secessionists, 274.
See also Charleston Harbor,
Pickens (Fort).
Foster, J. G., and forty-muskets
episode. 191, 200; reports
progress on Sumter, 195;
exposes "excitement fake,
201; and removal to Sumter,
208,

Sumter, 237; rejected by
Buchanan, 238; plan re-
newed, 294; in Charleston,
304; plan adopted, 305, 307;
preparation, 313, 331-333; at
Charleston bar, 333; effect of
expedition, 340.

Freeport Doctrine, Davis's at-
tack on, 99-101.
Fugitive-slave law, Crittenden
compromise on, 171,
Republican offer on, 173;
Lincoln's attitude, 280.

172;

GARDNER, J. L., commands

Charleston forts, 191; asks
reinforcement, 191; attempts
to secure ammunition, 192;
removal, 192.
Garnett, M. R. H., on Lincoln's
inaugural. 287.

Gaulden, W. B., on demand for

protection of slavery, 114.
Georgia, advises co-operative ac-
tion on secession, 140; oppo-
sition to secession, Stephens's
speech, 141-143; his despair
of preventing secession, 143;
secession to secure better
terms, 144.
Gill, G. B., and John Brown,
74.

Gillis, J. P., Sumter relief expe-
dition, 332.

Gilmer, J. A., in Congress, 90;
Lincoln's letter to, 279; de-
clines cabinet offer, 281, 282.
Gist, W. H., conference on
secession, 136; advises legis-
lature to act, 137; and rein-
forcement of forts, 155, 156.
Greeley, Horace, on Lincoln's
Cooper Institute speech, 102;
supports candidacy of Bates,
116; opposes Seward, 117;
'go in peace" policy, 164;
on Lincoln and compromise,
177.

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Huger, Benjamin, in charge of
Charleston arsenal, 193.
Hunter, R. M. T., and removal
to Sumter, 212; and Seward
and Confederate commission-
ers, 297.

Hurlbut, S. A., visit to Charles-
ton, 304.

ILLINOIS, instructions to Peace
Convention delegates, 272.
Immigration and slavery, 27.
Impeachment under Confeder-
ate constitution, 256.
Impending Crisis. See Helper.
Indiana, instructions to Peace
Convention delegates, 272.
Instruction, negro, John Brown's
hope for, 82, 88; Parker com-
mends, 84.

Internal improvements, Con-
federate constitution on, 256.
Isthmian transit, draught treaty
with Mexico (1859), 106.
Iverson, Alfred, on southern in-
tentions, 168; manifesto of
southern congressmen, 242.

JAMISON, D. F., and Sumter, 239.
Japan, first embassy, 126.
Jefferson, Thomas, and slavery,

6.

Holt, Joseph, and secession,
151; and removal to Sumter,

Jemison, Robert, Unionism, 145.
213; and reply to commis-Johnson, H. V., nominated for
sioners, 215; secretary of
war, 215; and relief of Sum-
ter, 224; promises Anderson

vice-president, 115.
Johnson, R. W., manifesto of
southern congressmen, 242.

Jones, D. R., and surrender of
Sumter, 339.

KAGI, J. H., and John Brown,

74; on Brown's design, 88.
Kansas, war as a phase of sec-
tionalism, 62; Pottawatomie
massacre, 70; Marais des
Cygnes massacre, 76.
Kansas-Nebraska act, effect on
slavery agitation, 58.
Keitt, L. M., on power of
South, 104.
Kentucky, decrease of slave
ratio, 22; no convention
called, 268; instructions to
Peace Convention delegates,

272.

LAMAR, JQ C., on growth of
nationalism, 14; in Congress,

90.

Lamon, W. H., visit to Charles-
ton, 304; unauthorized state-
ments, 305, 308, 321.
Lane, H. S., and Seward's can-
didacy, 122.

vote, 132; and Stephens,
143; and compromise, 172,
176, 180, 181, 279, 280; post-
election conduct, 278; letter
to Scott on forts, 278; letter
to Gilmer on attitude, 279;
consultation on cabinet, 280-
282; journey to Washington,
addresses, 282-284; on coer-
cion and invasion, 283; and
slavery in states, 284, 286;
and Baltimore plot, 284; at
Washington, 285; inaugural,
285; southerners on inaugu-
ral, 287; recognizes_impor-
tance of retaining Sumter,
289, 341; orders Scott to
maintain Federal property,
292; Scott's advice against
relief, 293; and Fox's plan,
294, 305; first cabinet coun-
cil on relief, 294-296; and
Scott's advice on Pickens,
305, 306; second cabinet
council on relief, 306; or-
ders relief expedition, 307;
informs Pickens of expedi-
tion, 310, 327; and Seward's
negotiations, 311; and Sew-
ard's "Thoughts," 312; and
Pensacola expedition, 314-
318; call for militia, 340; bib-
liography of beginning of ad-
ministration, 343-353; writ-
ings, 347; biographies, 349.
Longstreet, A. B., on necessity

Lane, Joseph, nominated for
vice-president, 116; expect-
ed election by Senate, 134.
Lawrence, A. A., on Crittenden
compromise, 174.
Lee R. E., and John Brown's
raid, 80.

Lee, S. D, and Sumter, 331, 339.
Letcher, John, on Seward, 98;

on coercion, 266.
Lincoln, election as reason for
secession, 93, 96, 129, 133,
137, 139, 144, 167; Cooper
Institute speech, 101, 102; na-
tionalism, 102, 283; candidacy
for presidential nomination,
116; votes for, nominated,
119; nomination a surprise,
119; basis of it, 120-123;
election foreshadowed, 126;
Seward's magnanimity, 130;
elected, popular and electoral

of constitutional action, 187.
Louisiana, secession, 146.
Lovejoy, Owen, disturbance in

House, 105; on navy, 124.
Lowell, J. R., on threats of dis-

union (1860), 127.

McDowELL, JAMES, on neces-

sity of slavery, 55.
McIntire, Peter, appointed col-

lector of Charleston, 220.
McLean, John, candidacy for
presidential nomination, 116.

1

Magoffin, Beriah, and secession,
268.

Magrath, A. G., resigns, 137;
and Sumter, 239.
Mallory, S. R., in Senate, 90;
manifesto of southern con-
gressmen, 242; and Brook-
lyn expedition to Pensacola,
250; Confederate secretary of
Manning, L., and surrender
J.
of Sumter, 339.
Manufactures, North and South
compared (1860), 28.
Marais des Cygnes massacre, 76.
Maryland, slave population
(1860), 21; its decrease, 22;
and secession, 268.
Mason, J. M., resolution
John Brown's raid, 95; on
sectional hostility, 149.
Massachusetts, instructions to
Peace Convention delegates,
271.

on

Maynard, Horace, in Congress,

90.

Meade, R. K., and removal to
Sumter, 208; and Star of the
West, 229.

Meigs, M. C., and Pensacola

expedition, 307, 314-319.
Memminger, C. G., Confederate

secretary of treasury, 255.
Mercer, Samuel, and relief ex-

peditions, 313, 315, 318.
Merriam, F. J., Harper's Ferry
raid, 78.

Mexico, Buchanan's proposed in-
tervention, 61, 106; draught
treaties, 106.
Michigan and Peace Conven-
tion, 273-

Miles, W. P., in Congress, 90;

and surrender of Sumter, 339.
Millson, J. S., on territorial sla-
very, 183.
Mississippi, secession, 146.
Missouri, slavery doomed, 22;
and secession, 268; instruc-

tions to Peace Convention
delegates, 272.

Moall, and removal to Sumter,
208.

Moore, A. B., on abolitionists,
165.

Morrill, J. S., in Congress, 90.
Morse, F. H., and navy, 125.
Moultrie, Fort, condition, 190.

See also Charleston Harbor.

Munroe, W. C., and John
Brown, 75.

NATIONALISM, divergent aspira-
tions, 4; growth of spirit of,
and slavery, 14; effect of
new states, 14; foreign to
southern interests, 15, 16;
Webster's propositions, 44,
45; Clay's attitude, 49; Web-
ster's attitude, 50; strength
of Unionism, 54, 58; Lincoln
on, 102, 283. See also Sec-
tionalism.

Navy, appropriations reduced
on eve of war, 124, 125;
moribund, 164.

Negro seamen acts and Re-
publican compromise offer,
173, 178.

Negroes, racial limitations of,
and slavery, 18.

Nelson, Samuel, and Seward's
Charleston Harbor negotia-
tions, 298, 300.

New England, secession move-
ment, 12.

New Jersey, instructions to
Peace Convention delegates,
271.

New Orleans, and secession of
South Carolina, 146; seizes
Federal property, 147; small
majority for secession, 147;
revenue-cutters episode, 246.
New York, growth, 22; tenders

aid to president, 267; in-
structions to Peace Conven-
tion delegates, 271.

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