Locksley Hall, and The Talking Oak

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J.R. Osgood and Company, 1877 - 88 pages

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Page 36 - Men, my brothers, men the workers, ever reaping something new: That which they have done but earnest of the things that they shall do.
Page 27 - I slew thee with my hand! Better thou and I were lying, hidden from the heart's disgrace, Roll'd in one another's arms, and silent in a last embrace. Cursed be the social wants that sin against the strength of youth! Cursed be the social lies that warp us from the living truth! Cursed be the sickly forms that err from honest Nature's rule! Cursed be the gold that gilds the straiten'd forehead of the fool!
Page 25 - As the husband is, the wife is : thou art mated with a clown, And the grossness of his nature will have weight to drag thee down. He will hold thee, when his passion shall have spent its novel force, Something better than his dog, a little dearer than his horse.
Page 31 - And an eye shall vex thee, looking ancient kindness on thy pain. Turn thee, turn thee on thy pillow: get thee to thy rest again. Nay, but Nature brings thee solace; for a tender voice will cry.
Page 30 - Comfort? comfort scorn'd of devils! this is truth the poet sings, That a sorrow's crown of sorrow is remembering happier things. Drug thy memories, lest thou learn it, lest thy heart be put to proof, In the dead unhappy night, and when the rain is on the roof.
Page 18 - On her pallid cheek and forehead came a colour and a light, As I have seen the rosy red flushing in the northern night. And she turn'd — her bosom shaken with a sudden storm of sighs — All the spirit deeply dawning in the dark of hazel eyes — Saying, ' I have hid my feelings, fearing they should do me wrong ; ' Saying, ' Dost thou love me, cousin ? ' weeping,
Page 26 - What is this? his eyes are heavy : think not they are glazed with wine. Go to him: it is thy duty: kiss him: take his hand in thine.
Page 16 - In the Spring a fuller crimson comes upon the Robin's breast ; In the Spring the wanton lapwing gets himself another crest ; In the Spring a livelier iris changes on the burnish'd dove ; In the Spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love.
Page 15 - I dipt into the future far as human eye could see ; Saw the Vision of the world, and all the wonder that would be.

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