Surviving Damnation

Front Cover
Benoitbooks.com, 2005 - 292 pages
This historical novel describes the most shameful event of the 18th. century North America. It is the little known story of the first settlers on this continent, deported by the English from their homeland of Acadia, now Nova Scotia. The author identifies one family surviving the misadvantures of damnation as exiles.

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Contents

Table of Contents
3
Introduction by Louis Benoit
4
Preface
6
Map of Acadia
7
Story Time Line
8
Acknowledgments
10
A Mikmaq Friendship
12
The Earthmovers
28
March To New France
178
Map of March to Canada
183
The Boston Post Road
184
An Untimely Birthday
190
Indians Come to Visit
199
Leicester Massachusetts
205
Lost in the Mountains
209
Survival of the Fittest
215

A Time of Peace
42
The Trading Post
61
Take It or Leave It
73
Logistics of an Exodus
85
Le Grand Dérangement
94
Farewell Acadia
106
Devastation and Suffering
114
Arrival in Boston
125
Once Acadian Always Acadian
139
Lancaster Massachusetts
152
Wedding Bells at Last
162
PreRevolutionary Times
169
Vermont Compatriots
224
Lake Champlain and Ft Chambly
230
Montréal None Too Soon
237
Louisiana the New Acadia
241
Happiness in Louisiana
249
International Crimes Court
254
Prince William and Grandmother
274
Epilogue by Warren A Perrin
280
Works Consulted
282
Authors Ancestral Chart 255
285
About the Author
287
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Dr.R.W."Ben" Benoit has been a resident of Colorado for thirty-five years and is formerly from New England. He is a retired High Shcool teacher, administrator and coach from the Littleon Public Schools in Colorado. He has done graduate work in France at the U.of Bordeaux, at the U. of Denver and earned his doctoral degree in French Literature at the U. of Kansas.When Ben became an avid student of Genealogy, he discovered his Acadian ancestry. There were many Benoits, but he definitely was not interested in "name gathering." He chose writing rather than becoming a "database expert." He was not satifsfied in merely gathering raw facts of people being born, marrying and being buried, but in researcing the times and places in which they lived and/or in the historical events in which which they might have been involved. Like the French Expressionists, what excited Ben was to use facts as points of color that, at a distance, blended to create scenes so real, one could feel the emotions of these ancestors.Since then he has seen two of his family history books published. The latter, "Conversations With Ancestors" was featured in the National Genealogical Society Newsmagazine in 2001.

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