Philanthropic Economy: Or, The Philosophy of Happiness, Practically Applied to the Social, Political and Commercial Relations of Great Britain

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E. Churton, 1835 - 312 pages
 

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Page 266 - Beware of the scribes, which desire to walk in long robes, and love greetings in the markets, and the highest seats in the synagogues, and the chief rooms at feasts ; 47 Which devour widows' houses, and for a shew make long prayers: the same shall receive greater damnation.
Page 143 - ... people as little as possible, over and above what it brings into the public treasury of the state. A tax may either take out or keep out of the pockets of the people a great deal more than it brings into the public treasury, in the four following ways. First? the levying of it may require a great number of officers, whose salaries may eat up the greater part of the produce of the tax, and whose perquisites may impose another additional tax upon the people.
Page 143 - ... 4. Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and to keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible over and above what it brings into the public treasury of the state. A tax may either take out or keep out of the pockets of the people a great deal more than it brings into the public treasury, in the four following ways.
Page 66 - Labour was the first price, the original purchasemoney that was paid for all things. It was not by gold or by silver, but by labour, that all the wealth of the world was originally purchased; and its value to those who possess it and who want to exchange it for some new productions is precisely equal to the quantity of labour which it can enable them to purchase or command.
Page 68 - No society can surely be flourishing and happy, of which the far greater part of the members are poor and miserable. It is but equity, besides, that they who feed, clothe and lodge the whole body of the people, should have such a share of the produce of their own labor as to be themselves tolerably well fed, clothed and lodged.
Page 129 - ... half of that which his Creator has furnished him with the natural means of obtaining for himself. Surely as much food as a man can buy, with as much wages as a man can get, for as much work as a man can do, is not more than the natural, inalienable birthright of every man whom God has created, with strength to labour, and with hands to work.
Page 107 - Labour is there so well rewarded, that a numerous family of children, instead of being a burthen, is a source of opulence and prosperity to the parents. The labour of each child, before it can leave their house, is computed to be worth a hundred pounds clear gain to them.
Page i - Secondly, taxes upon the necessaries of life have nearly the same effect upon the circumstances of the people as a poor soil and a bad climate. Provisions are thereby rendered dearer in the same manner as if it required extraordinary labour and expense to raise them.
Page 119 - ... sense. The consequences cannot be mistaken : the embarrassment of our shipping, mercantile, and manufacturing interests want of employment, and desperate poverty among the labouring population an increase of crime, and a tendency to emigration a loss of our currency, and a fall of the prices of labour and of corn a diminution of the public revenue, and a derangement of the public finances and, more than all, the certain eventual ruin of the agricultural interest itself...
Page 111 - The unlimited, unrestrained freedom of the corn trade, as it is the only effectual preventative of the miseries of a famine, so it is the best palliative of the inconveniences of a dearth; for the inconveniences of a real scarcity cannot be remedied, they can only be palliated.

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