The Works of Jonathan Swift ...: With Copious Notes and Additions, and a Memoir of the Author, Volume 5

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Derby & Jackson, 1861
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Page 162 - For where envying and strife is, there is confusion and every evil work. But the wisdom that is from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be entreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy. And the fruit of righteousness is sown in peace of them that make peace...
Page 507 - Th' unwilling gratitude of base mankind. POPE. ' CENSURE,' says a late ingenious author, ' is the tax a man pays to the public for being eminent.
Page 115 - But as touching brotherly love ye need not that I write unto you : for ye yourselves are taught of God to love one another.
Page 164 - But if ye have bitter envying and strife in your hearts, glory not, and lie not against the truth. This wisdom descendeth not from above, but is earthly, sensual, devilish. For where envying and strife is, there is confusion and every evil work.
Page 17 - There is likewise another great advantage in my scheme, that it will prevent those voluntary abortions, and that horrid practice of women murdering their bastard children, alas! too frequent among us, sacrificing the poor innocent babes, I doubt, more to avoid the expense than the shame, which would move tears and pity in the most savage and inhuman breast.
Page 137 - Remove far from me vanity and lies: give me neither poverty nor riches ; feed me with food convenient for me: lest I be full, and deny thee, and say, Who is the Lord? or lest I be poor, and steal, and take the name of my God in vain.
Page 21 - Fifthly, this food would likewise bring great custom to taverns, where the vintners will certainly be so prudent as to procure the best receipts for dressing it to perfection, and consequently have their houses frequented by all the fine gentlemen, who justly value themselves upon their knowledge in good eating...
Page 513 - GOOD manners is the art of making those people easy with whom 'we converse. Whoever makes the fewest persons uneasy is the best bred in the company.
Page 94 - Likewise, ye younger, submit yourselves unto the elder. Yea, all of you be subject one to another, and be clothed with humility : for God resisteth the proud, and giveth grace to the humble.
Page 510 - Love of flattery, in most men, proceeds from the mean opinion they have of themselves ; in women, from the contrary.

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