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259—Dictation

Goods are carried over land by porters in Africa, by dogs in Siberia, by llamas in the Andes, by camels on the desert, by reindeer in Lapland, and by horses and railroads in more civilized countries.

The steamer “Empress of India," from Bombay, passed through the Suez Canal, laden with myrrh, camphor, nutmegs, cassia, shellac, ambergris, asafetida, tapestry, matting, cardamoms, and pomegranates.

260—Famous Buildings

Fö'rum
Våt'i can

Wind sor Cas tle
Louvre
Pär'the non

Win ter Pal ace St. Mark's Col i sē'um Döġ'e's Palace St. Paul's Cåt'a combs

Crys tal Pal ace St. Pe ter's Säns Sou çi' Lean ing Tow er Krēm'lin if fel' Tow er Arch of Tri umph

Write where each building is found and something about it.

261-Kings and Queens of England
“ First William, the Norman, then William, his son;

Henry, Stephen, and Henry, then Richard and John.
Next Henry the Third, Edwards one, two, and three ;
And again, after Richard, three Henrys we see.
Two Edwards, third Richard, if rightly I guess;
Two Henrys, sixth Edward, Queen Mary, Queen Bess.
Then Jamie, the Scotchman, then Charles whom they slew,
Yet received after Cromwell another Charles too.
Next James called the Second ascended the throne;
Then good William and Mary together came on;
Till Anne, Georges four, and fourth William passed,
God sent Queen Victoria ; may she long be the last.”

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PART III

266 Copy :

Make for yourselves nests of pleasant thoughts! None of us yet know, for none of us have been taught in early youth, what fairy palaces we may build of beautiful thoughts, proof against all adversity ; bright fancies, satisfied memories, noble histories, faithful sayings, treasure-houses of precious and restful thoughts, which care cannot disturb, nor pain make gloomy, nor poverty take away from us; houses built without hands for souls to live in.-Ruskin.

267—History

In di an
squaw scalped

wil der ness spear pap poose ship wreck

suf fer ing wiġ wam

ex plore set tle ment wam pum

cal u met moc ca sin dis cov er y per ma nent Dutch tom a hawk pi o neers nav i ga tor Span ish

i

war rior

col o ny

English

Bal bo'a
Cham plain'
Fran'cis Drake
Ponce de Le on'
Walter Ra'leigh

Se bas'tian Cab'ot
A mer'i cus Ves pu'cius
Chris'to pher Co lum'bus
Fer'di nand de So'to
Bar thol'o mew Gos'nold

Write in vertical columns : name a place discovered | date of discovery.

Ex.: Balboa | Pacific Ocean | 1513.

268—Prefixes

A prefix is a syllable or syllables joined to the beginning of a word to change its meaning.

mis—wrong, wrongly: misuse, to use wrongly. un—not : unreal, not real. mis : judge, deeds, place, call, con duct, deal, fit, fort une,

lead, pro nounce, print, count. un : easy, buck le, de cid ed, loose, mar ried, a ware, mer

ci ful, sea son a ble, skill ful, thank ful.

Write the words with the prefix. Write sentences, using five of the words you have just made.

269—Dictation

The Indian invented the snow-shoe and the birch canoe.
De Soto was buried in the Mississippi.
Raleigh wrote on a window-pane, “Fain would I climb,

, yet fear I to fall.” Queen Elizabeth, seeing the line, wrote below, “ If thy heart fails thee, do not climb at all."

Florida was named in honor of Easter, the day on which Ponce de Leon landed. The Spanish name for Easter is Pascua Florida.

270—Arithmetic

par tial

specific

par
re ceipt rad i cal

pro por tion târe

re cip ro cal in dex ra ti o

pre mi um

prom is so ry pro ceeds en dorse

con sign'or ad va lo' rern mort

gage con sign ee' ev o lu tion as sets

con se quent in vo lu tion ledg er ex põ'nent cred it or li a bil i ties

prof it

pol i cy

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clem'a tis
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tube'rose
jon'quil
nar cis'sus
nas tur'tium
rho do den'dron

he pat'i ca

co'le us

gen'tian

pe tu'ni a

wis ta'ri a 8x a lis

daf'fo dil
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ettel

272

Flower, in the crannied wall,
I pluck you out of the crannies ;-
Hold you here, root and all, in my hand,
Little flower-but if I could understand
What you are, root and all, and all in all,

I should know what God and man is.- Tennyson. Copy, learn, and recite.

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cler ic al hys ter'ic al mir a cle spher ic al critic al

sym met ric al ob sta cle sur gic al

cyn

ic al i den tic al par ti cle trag ic al whim şi cal gram mat ic al spec ta cle op tic al

an a lyt ic al trēa'cle clas sic al physical

ē nig mat'ic al man a cle com ic al med ic al em blem at ic al

prac ti cal

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