The Sculptures of the Parthenon

Front Cover
J. Murray, 1903 - 173 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 118 - I trust, from ever forgetting—what is meant by the virtue of handling in sculpture. The projection of the heads of the four horses, one behind the other, is certainly not more, altogether, than three-quarters of an inch from the flat ground, and the one in front does not in reality project more than the one behind it, yet, by mere drawing,* you see the sculptor has got them to appear to recede in due order, and by the soft rounding of the flesh surfaces, and modulation of the veins, he has taken...
Page 1 - WHEN the Parthenon stood forth complete on the Acropolis of Athens in or about the year 438 BC, there was no other building in the whole of Greece comparable even in the mere extent and variety of its sculptures.1 Imagine a frieze 522 feet in length sculptured all along with figures nearly half life size, in many parts densely crowded till the marble could carry no more, the whole in very low relief and executed with marvellous detail. Above the columns externally and round all the four sides of...
Page 2 - ... workmanship. Within each of the two pediments or gables was an immense group of statues, the smallest equal to life size, the central figures colossal. Lastly, inside the Parthenon was the stupendous statue of Athene herself in gold and ivory by Pheidias. It was he who directed the whole of the...
Page 1 - B. c., there was no other building in the whole of Greece comparable even in the mere extent and variety of its sculptures.1 Imagine a frieze 522 feet in length sculptured all along with figures nearly half life-size, in many parts densely crowded till the marble could carry no more, the whole in very low relief and executed with marvellous detail. Above the columns externally and round all the four sides of the temple were ninety-two metopes, each consisting of a group of two figures two-thirds...

Bibliographic information